Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 41, Issue 3, pp 203–219 | Cite as

Curriculum Alignment with a Mission of Social Change in Higher Education

  • Iris M. Yob
  • Steven L. Danver
  • Sheryl Kristensen
  • William Schulz
  • Kathy Simmons
  • Henry M. Brashen
  • Rebecca Sidler Krysiak
  • Linda Kiltz
  • Linda Gatlin
  • Suzanne Wesson
  • Diane R. Penland
Article

Abstract

Institutions of higher education frequently acknowledge their role in contributing to the common good through their mission statements. The current literature suggests that in order to be effective mission statements must be clearly articulated and reflected in all the activities of the institution including its curriculum. Faculty members at Walden University developed a Curriculum Guide for Social Change that could serve as a tool for reviewing current course offerings and developing new courses to reflect its mission of “creating positive social change.” Those involved in piloting the Guide report on the process in this article. The general consensus is that it was time-consuming and frequently subjective; but the Guide gave substance to the institution’s mission, opening the way for its fuller implementation.

Keywords

mission statement social change curriculum development higher education civic engagement movement 

References

  1. Abaidoo, S., & Wachniak, L. (2007). Re-thinking graduate education: An imperative for a changing world. International Journal of Learning, 14, 205–214.Google Scholar
  2. Bartkus, B., Glassman, M., & McAfee, B. (2000). Mission statements: Are they smoke and mirrors? Business Horizons, 83, 23–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Berger, J. (2008). A mission counterstatement. Academe, 94, 25–27.Google Scholar
  4. Boehm, A. (2010). University involvement in social planning: Perspectives of community institutions and universities. Journal of Higher Education and Policy Management, 32, 97–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Boyer, E. L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the professorate. Washington, DC: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.Google Scholar
  6. Camelia, G., & Marius, P. (2013). Mission statements in higher education: Context analysis and research propositions. Annals of Faculty of Economics, 1653-1663.Google Scholar
  7. Cochran, D. S., David, F. R., & Gibson, C. K. (2008). A framework for developing an effective mission statement. Journal of Business Strategies, 25(2), 27–39.Google Scholar
  8. Davies, S., & Glaister, K. (1997). Business school mission statements: The bland leading the bland? Long Range Planning, 30, 594–604.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Davis, J., Ruhe, J., Lee, M., & Rajadjyaksha, U. (2007). Mission possible: Do school mission statements work? Journal of Business Ethics, 70, 99–110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Desmidt, S., Prinzie, A., & Heene, A. (2008). The level and determinants of mission statement use: A questionnaire survey. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 45, 1433–1444.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Eyler, J., Giles, E., Stenson, C. M., & Gray, C. J. (2001). At a glance: What we know about the effects of service-learning on college students, faculty, institutions and communities, 1993-2000 (3rd ed.). Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Feldman, J. M. (2001). Towards the post-university: Centres of higher learning and creative spaces as economic development and social change agents. Economic and Industrial Democracy, 22, 99–142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Fairhurst, G., & Jordan, J. (1997). Why are we here? Managing the meaning of an organizational mission statement. Journal of Applied Community Research, 25, 243–264.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Finley, A. (2011). Civic learning and democratic engagements: A review of the literature on civic engagement in post-secondary education. Washington, DC: American Association of Colleges and Universities.Google Scholar
  15. Ireland, D., & Hitt, M. (1992). Mission statements: Importance, challenge and recommendations for development. Business Horizons, 35, 34–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Krohe, J. (1995). Do you really need a mission statement? Across the Board, 32, 17–21.Google Scholar
  17. Kuh, G. D., Kinzie, J., Schuh, J. H., Whitt, E. J., & Associates. (2005a). Student success in college: Creating conditions that matter. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  18. Kuh, G. D., Kinzie, J., Schuh, J. H., Whitt, E. J., & Associates. (2005b). Assessing conditions to enhance educational effectiveness. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  19. Lucas, J. (1998, February). Anatomy of a vision statement. Management Review, 87(2), 22–27.Google Scholar
  20. Musil, C. T. (2015). Civic prompts: Making civic learning routine across the disciplines. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.Google Scholar
  21. National Task Force on Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement. (2012). A crucible moment: College learning and democracy’s future. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.Google Scholar
  22. Piercy, N. F., & Morgan, N. A. (1994). Mission analysis: An operational approach. Journal of General Management, 19(2), 1–19.Google Scholar
  23. Sidhu, J. (2003). Mission statements: Is it time to shelve them? European Management Journal, 21, 439–436.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Staples, W., & Black, K. (1984). Defining our business mission: A strategic perspective. Journal of Business Strategies, 1, 33–39.Google Scholar
  25. Williams, J., Smythe, W., Hadjistavropoulos, T., Malloy, D., & Martin, R. (2005). A study of thematic content in hospital mission statements: A question of values. Health Care Management Review, 30, 304–314.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Yob, I. M. (2014). Keeping students in by sending them out: Retention and service-learning. Higher Education Research Communications, 4(2), 38–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iris M. Yob
    • 1
  • Steven L. Danver
    • 1
  • Sheryl Kristensen
    • 1
  • William Schulz
    • 1
  • Kathy Simmons
    • 1
  • Henry M. Brashen
    • 1
  • Rebecca Sidler Krysiak
    • 1
  • Linda Kiltz
    • 1
  • Linda Gatlin
    • 1
  • Suzanne Wesson
    • 1
  • Diane R. Penland
    • 1
  1. 1.Walden UniversityMinneapolisUSA

Personalised recommendations