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The Development of a Service-Learning Program for First-Year Students Based on the Hallmarks of High Quality Service-learning and Rigorous Program Evaluation

Abstract

We describe six hallmarks of high quality service-learning and explain how these considerations guided the development of a Transitional Coaching Program (TCP) during the first three years of implementation. We have demonstrated that the TCP is acceptable, feasible, and sustainable. Improvements have been seen in the degree of impact on learning objectives, but statistically significant change has not yet been achieved. This project highlights the importance of looking beyond satisfaction and engaging in rigorous assessment of learning objectives and ongoing quality improvement through attention to best practices and evidence-based, continuous quality improvement.

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Correspondence to Bradley H. Smith.

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Smith, B.H., Gahagan, J., McQuillin, S. et al. The Development of a Service-Learning Program for First-Year Students Based on the Hallmarks of High Quality Service-learning and Rigorous Program Evaluation. Innov High Educ 36, 317–329 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10755-011-9177-9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10755-011-9177-9

Key words

  • Service-Learning
  • Evidence-based course development