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Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 83–96 | Cite as

Studying the Professional Lives and Work of Faculty Involved in Community Engagement

  • KerryAnn O’Meara
  • Lorilee R. Sandmann
  • John Saltmarsh
  • Dwight E. GilesJr.
Article

Abstract

Community engagement is one of the major innovations that has occurred in higher education over the last 20 years. At the center of this innovation are faculty members because of their intimate ties to the academic mission. This article examines the progress that has been made in understanding this critical area of faculty work. It builds on past research to consider how the conceptualization of faculty community engagement influences the kinds of questions we ask about it and the kinds of recruitment, support, and professional growth we provide. Implications of the study and for the practice of faculty community engagement are provided for researchers, administrators, and faculty members.

Key words

Faculty community engagement 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • KerryAnn O’Meara
    • 1
  • Lorilee R. Sandmann
    • 2
  • John Saltmarsh
    • 3
  • Dwight E. GilesJr.
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Education Leadership, Higher Education, and International EducationUniversity of Maryland, College ParkCollege ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Lifelong Education, Administration, and PolicyThe University of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  3. 3.Department of Leadership in Education and the New England Resource Center for Higher EducationUniversity of Massachusetts BostonBostonUSA
  4. 4.Higher Education Administration and the New England Resource Center for Higher EducationUniversity of Massachusetts, BostonBostonUSA

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