Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 97–106 | Cite as

Reconsidering the Relationship Between Student Engagement and Persistence in College

Article

Abstract

Using data from two rounds of surveys on students in the Washington State Achievers (WSA) program, this study examined the relationship between student engagement in college activities and student persistence in college. Different approaches using student engagement measures in the persistence models were compared. The results indicated that the relationship between student engagement and the probability of persisting was not linear. Even though a higher level of social engagement was related to an increased probability of persisting, a higher level of academic engagement was negatively related to such probability. The findings have strong implications for educational research, policy, and practice.

Key words

Student engagement Persistence Academic engagement Social engagement Student success 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dept. of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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