Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 35, Issue 3, pp 191–202

Accelerated Learning: A Study of Faculty and Student Experiences

Article

Abstract

In this study we explored faculty and student experiences of accelerated learning. We conducted interviews with faculty members who had delivered the same course in 12 and 6-week timeframes, and we analysed a student survey. Students reported overall positive experiences in the accelerated courses, particularly in the social aspects of learning, higher than usual motivation, and confidence in their learning. However, both faculty and students raised concerns about the scope and timing of assessment tasks, student workload expectations, faculty workload, and administration of courses. We offer recommendations regarding implementation, assessment practices, and management of learning in an accelerated timeframe.

Key words

accelerated learning academic calendar curriculum 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Swinburne Professional Learning, Higher Education Office H20Swinburne University of TechnologyHawthornAustralia

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