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Implementing Effective Online Teaching Practices: Voices of Exemplary Faculty

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ABSTRACT

This qualitative study explores the process of implementing effective online teaching practices through interviews with thirty exemplary instructors. Emergent themes include providing students with constructive feedback, fostering interaction and involvement, facilitating student learning, and maintaining instructor presence and organization. Analyses of the findings and implications for online instruction are presented.

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Acknowledgments

The authors thank the faculty participants of this study for their willingness to share their experiences and teaching strategies. Special thanks to Kerri-Lee Krause, Pam Dello-Russo, Cynthia Whitesel, and several anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of the paper.

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Correspondence to Cassandra C. Lewis.

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An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education.

Cassandra C. Lewis is a research assistant at the University of Maryland University College. She is also a doctoral candidate in the department of Education Policy and Leadership at the University of Maryland, College Park. Husein Abdul-Hamid is Associate Provost and Executive Director of the Office of Evaluation, Research, and Grants at the University of Maryland University College. He holds a Ph.D. in Statistics from American University.

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Lewis, C.C., Abdul-Hamid, H. Implementing Effective Online Teaching Practices: Voices of Exemplary Faculty. Innov High Educ 31, 83–98 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10755-006-9010-z

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