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A Study of Faculty Perceptions of Summer Compressed Course Teaching

Abstract

Students take summer and compressed courses for a variety of reasons and research indicates that learning outcomes in these courses are similar to those gained in traditional semester or quarter courses. This quantitative study was an attempt to clarify faculty perceptions about summer compressed courses. One hundred and fifty-one faculty members teaching at a large, multicampus institution completed a survey addressing teaching methodology, approaches to student assessment, and other pedagogical issues relating to such courses. It was determined that many faculty did make adjustments in teaching methods and approaches to student assessment. In addition, perceptions were different between experienced/tenured faculty and inexperienced/nontenured faculty.

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Authors

Additional information

Mark Kretovics is an Assistant Professor of Higher Education Administration and Student Personnel at Kent State University. He received his Ph.D. from Colorado State University and his research interests include the assessment of student learning, business practices in higher education, distance education, and pedagogical issues in compressed courses. Mark had over 20 years of administrative experience within higher education before transitioning into his current faculty role. Alicia R. Crowe, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Teaching, Leadership, and Curriculum Studies at Kent State University. Her areas of interest and research include teacher education, social studies education, teacher learning, and technology integration. Eunsook Hyun, Ph.D. is Associate Professor in the Department of Teaching, Leadership, and Curriculum Studies at Kent State University. Her area of research interests include teacher education, critical pedagogy, curriculum theorizing, and higher education curriculum

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Kretovics, M.A., Crowe, A.R. & Hyun, E. A Study of Faculty Perceptions of Summer Compressed Course Teaching. Innov High Educ 30, 37–51 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10755-005-3295-1

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Key Words

  • summer teaching
  • compressed courses
  • faculty perceptions
  • pedagogy