Phylogeography of the freshwater mussel species Lasmigona costata: testing post-glacial colonization hypotheses

Abstract

Understanding genetic diversity across large spatial scales helps to reveal patterns of population structure. Mitochondrial DNA sequences and microsatellite loci were used to analyze the phylogeography of a common unionid species (Lasmigona costata) from the Laurentian Great Lakes and historically connected river drainages. Phylogeographic patterns were assessed to determine colonization routes into the Great Lakes following glacial recession. A suite of seven microsatellite loci were genotyped and a fragment of the mitochondrial gene COI was sequenced. Multiple analyses using microsatellite allele frequencies suggest at least two distinct genetic populations for L. costata. A total of seven hypothesized post-glacial dispersal scenarios were compared using isolation by distance to test the various dispersal models. Evidence was strongest for two post-glacial dispersal routes into the Great Lakes: one utilizing a connection between the Wabash and Maumee River watersheds, and one utilizing a connection between the Wisconsin River and Green Bay watersheds. A highly differentiated and monophyletic population of L. costata was identified in the Ozark Highlands, which may constitute a unique taxonomic entity.

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Acknowledgments

Funding for this project came from grants through the Faculty Research and Creative Endeavors program and the Research Excellence Fund at Central Michigan University. A research assistantship was granted to TLH from the CMU College of Science and Engineering. Many people assisted in sample collection in the field including: Brant Fischer from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Dr. Todd Crail from the University of Toledo, Steve McMurray and Scott Faiman from the Missouri Department of Conservation, Kevin Cummings and Jeremy Tiemann from the Illinois Natural History Survey, and Lisie Kitchel from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. We also thank Dr. Bradley Swanson and Dr. Andrew Mahon for helpful guidance and discussion on earlier versions of this manuscript. Other members of the CMU Biology Department have been great resources throughout this project and have been invaluable in helping to see this project through: Shaughn Barnett, Mariah Wild Scott, Jordan Hoffman, Amanda Chambers, Mandi Caldwell, and Adrienne Gibson. This article is a contribution #75 of the Central Michigan University Institute for Great Lakes Research.

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Correspondence to Trevor L. Hewitt.

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Guest editors: Manuel P. M. Lopes-Lima, Ronaldo G. Sousa, Lyuba E. Burlakova, Alexander Y. Karatayev & Knut Mehler / Ecology and Conservation of Freshwater Bivalves

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Hewitt, T.L., Bergner, J.L., Woolnough, D.A. et al. Phylogeography of the freshwater mussel species Lasmigona costata: testing post-glacial colonization hypotheses. Hydrobiologia 810, 191–206 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10750-016-2834-3

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Keywords

  • Freshwater mussels
  • mtDNA
  • Microsatellites
  • Glacial refugia
  • Population genetics