James Aho and Kevin Aho: Body Matters: A Phenomenology of Sickness, Disease, and Illness

Lexington Books, Lanham, MD, 2008, x + 199 pages

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Notes

  1. 1.

    A number of African and Asian cultures believe that Zar spirits can befall a person, particularly women. Once possessed, the victims display a variety of behaviors, resembling symptoms of hysteria.

References

  1. Brown, P. (2008). Perspective in medical sociology. Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Conrad, P. (2008). The sociology of health and illness. Plymouth, MI: Worth Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Freund, P., McGuire, M., & Podhurst, L. S. (2002). Illness and the social body. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Hearn, G. (2010). The brotherhood of pain: The experience of persistent pain among college football players. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association, Oakland, California, April 2010.

  5. Helman, C. (2007). Culture, health, and illness. London: Hodder Arnold.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Nettleton, S. (2006). The sociology of health and illness. Cambridge: Polity Press.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Weitz, R. (2009). Sociology of health, illness, and health care. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Gesine Hearn.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Hearn, G. James Aho and Kevin Aho: Body Matters: A Phenomenology of Sickness, Disease, and Illness. Hum Stud 33, 325–331 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10746-010-9142-0

Download citation