Human Studies

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 361–376 | Cite as

Merleau-Ponty and Epistemology Engines

Article

Abstract

One of us coined the notion of an “epistemology engine.” The idea is that some particular technology in its workings and use is seen suggestively as a metaphor for the human subject and often for the production of knowledge itself. In this essay, we further develop the conceptand claim that Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological commitments, although suggestive, did not lead him to appreciate the epistemological value of materiality. We also take steps towards establishing how an understanding of this topic can provide the basis for reinterpreting the history of phenomenology.

camera obscura embodiment epistemology Merleau-Ponty Maurice perception technoscience 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyStony Brook UniversityStony BrookUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhilosophyRochester Institute of TechnologyRochesterUSA

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