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The Traditional Use of Plants for Handicrafts in Southeastern Europe

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Notes

  1. 1.

    We have excluded two types of botanical handicrafts from this study: plant-based musical instruments, which have a highly specific character; and broom-making, for which see Nedelcheva et al. 2007 and Dogan et al. 2009.

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Acknowledgements

The authors wish to express their sincere thanks to Prof. Dr. Nancy J. Turner (School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada) for her support in checking the English language of the manuscript and for her constructive comments. Thanks are also due to the all study participants, in especially those who were interviewed for the key informant study, for their time and who shared their knowledge and experience.

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Correspondence to Yunus Dogan.

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Nedelcheva, A., Dogan, Y., Obratov-Petkovic, D. et al. The Traditional Use of Plants for Handicrafts in Southeastern Europe. Hum Ecol 39, 813–828 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10745-011-9432-9

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Keywords

  • Linum Usitatissimum
  • Vegetative Part
  • Balkan Country
  • Young Twig
  • Fashion Brand