Human Ecology

, Volume 38, Issue 6, pp 721–729 | Cite as

Indigenous Wetland Burning: Conserving Natural and Cultural Resources in Australia’s World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park

  • Sandra McGregor
  • Violet Lawson
  • Peter Christophersen
  • Rod Kennett
  • James Boyden
  • Peter Bayliss
  • Adam Liedloff
  • Barbie McKaige
  • Alan N. Andersen
Article

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Copyright information

© Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra McGregor
    • 1
  • Violet Lawson
    • 2
  • Peter Christophersen
    • 1
  • Rod Kennett
    • 3
  • James Boyden
    • 4
  • Peter Bayliss
    • 4
    • 5
  • Adam Liedloff
    • 1
  • Barbie McKaige
    • 1
  • Alan N. Andersen
    • 1
  1. 1.Bushfire Cooperative Research Centre and CSIRO Sustainable EcosystemsWinnellieAustralia
  2. 2.Paradise FarmJabiruAustralia
  3. 3.Kakadu National Park, Parks AustraliaJabiruAustralia
  4. 4.Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising ScientistDarwinAustralia
  5. 5.CSIRO Marine & Atmospheric ResearchClevelandAustralia

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