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Reflections on Darwin Historiography

Abstract

Much has happened in the Darwin field since the Correspondence began publishing in 1985. This overview of historiography suggests that the richness of the letters generates fresh scholarly questions and that Darwin, paradoxically, is becoming progressively deconstructed as a key figure in the history of science.

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Browne, J. Reflections on Darwin Historiography. J Hist Biol (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10739-022-09686-5

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Keywords

  • History
  • Biology
  • Darwin