Advertisement

Journal of the History of Biology

, Volume 50, Issue 1, pp 5–52 | Cite as

The Contributions – and Collapse – of Lamarckian Heredity in Pasteurian Molecular Biology: 1. Lysogeny, 1900–1960

  • Laurent Loison
  • Jean Gayon
  • Richard M. Burian
Article

Abstract

This article shows how Lamarckism was essential in the birth of the French school of molecular biology. We argue that the concept of inheritance of acquired characters positively shaped debates surrounding bacteriophagy and lysogeny in the Pasteurian tradition during the interwar period. During this period the typical Lamarckian account of heredity treated it as the continuation of protoplasmic physiology in daughter cells. Félix d’Hérelle applied this conception to argue that there was only one species of bacteriophage and Jules Bordet applied it to develop an account of bacteriophagy as a transmissible form of autolysis and to analyze the new phenomenon of lysogeny. In a long-standing controversy with Bordet, Eugène Wollman deployed a more morphological understanding of the inheritance of acquired characters, yielding a particulate, but still Lamarckian, account of lysogeny. We then turn to André Lwoff who, with several colleagues, completed Wollman’s research program from 1949 to 1953. We examine how he gradually set aside the Lamarckian background, finally removing inheritance of acquired characters from the resulting account of bacteriophagy and lysogeny. In the conclusion, we emphasize the complex dual role of Lamarckism as it moved from an assumed explanatory framework to a challenge that the nascent molecular biology had to overcome.

Keywords

Lamarckism Inheritance of acquired characters Lysogeny Molecular biology Bacteriophage Pasteur Institute Jules Bordet Eugène Wollman André Lwoff 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Andrewes, Christopher H. 1952. “Viruses as organisms.” Poliomyelitis. Second International Poliomyelitis Conference. Philadelphia: Lippincott, pp. 3–5.Google Scholar
  2. Bail, Oskar. 1925. “Der Kolistamm 88 von Gildemeister und Herzberg.” Medizinische Klinik 21: 1277–1279.Google Scholar
  3. Bawden, F. C. 1952. “Virus and Its Interaction with the Host Cell: Biochemical Aspects.” Poliomyelitis. Second International Poliomyelitis Conference. Philadelphia: Lippincott, pp. 9–12.Google Scholar
  4. Bawden, F. C. and Pirie, N. W. 1951. “Virus Multiplication Considered as a Form of Protein Synthesis.” P. Fildes and W. E. Van Heyningen (eds.), The Nature of Virus Multiplication. Symposia of the Society for General Microbiology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 21–24.Google Scholar
  5. Bernard, Claude. 1872. De la physiologie générale. Paris: Hachette.Google Scholar
  6. Blaringhem, Louis. 1923. Pasteur et le transformisme. Paris: Masson.Google Scholar
  7. Bordet, Jules. 1925. “Pouvoir lysogène actif ou spontané et pouvoir lysogène passif ou provoqué.” Comptes Rendus de la Société de Biologie 93: 1054–1056.Google Scholar
  8. Bordet, Jules. 1931. “The Theories of the Bacteriophage.” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, B 107: 398–417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Bordet, Jules and Ciuca, M. 1920. “Exsudats leucocytaires et autolyse microbienne transmissible.” Comptes Rendus de la Société de Biologie 83: 1293–1295.Google Scholar
  10. Bordet, Jules and Ciuca, M. 1920b. “Le bactériophage de d’Hérelle, sa production et son interprétation.” Comptes Rendus de la Société de Biologie 83: 1296–1299 and 84: 747–748.Google Scholar
  11. Bordet, Jules and Ciuca, M. 1921a. “Evolution des cultures de coli lysogène.” Comptes Rendus de la Société de Biologie 84: 747–748.Google Scholar
  12. Bordet, Jules and Ciuca, M. 1921b. “Remarques su’ l’historique des recherches concernant la lyse microbienne transmissible.” Comptes Rendus de la Société de Biologie 84: 745–747.Google Scholar
  13. Bordet, Jules and Renaux, E. 1928. “L’autolyse microbienne transmissible ou le bactériophage.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 42: 1283–1335.Google Scholar
  14. Brock, Thomas D. 1990. The Emergence of Bacterial Genetics. Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.Google Scholar
  15. Burian, Richard M., Gayon, Jean, and Zallen, Doris T. 1988. “The Singular Fate of Genetics in the History of French Biology, 1900–1940.” Journal of the History of Biology 21: 357–402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Burian, Richard M. and Gayon, Jean. 1991. “Un évolutionniste bernardien à l’Institut Pasteur ? Morphologie des ciliés et évolution physiologique dans l’œuvre d’André Lwoff.” Michel Morange (ed.), L’Institut Pasteur, Contributions à son histoire. Paris: La Découverte, pp. 165–186.Google Scholar
  17. Burian, Richard M. and Gayon, Jean. 1999. “The French School of Genetics: From Physiological and Population Genetics to Regulatory Molecular Genetics.” Annual Review of Genetics 33: 313–349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Burian, Richard M. and Gayon, Jean. 2004. “National Traditions and the Emergence of Genetics: The French Example.” Nature Reviews Genetics 5: 150–156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Burnet, Frank MacFarlane and McKie, Margot. 1929. “Observations on a Permanently Lysogenic Strain of B. enteridis gaertner.” Australian Journal of Experimental Biology and Medicine 6: 277–284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Burnet, Frank Macfarlane and Lush, Dora. 1936. “Induced Lysogenicity and Mutation of Bacteriophage within Lysogenic Bacteria.” Australian Journal of Experimental Biology and Medicine 14: 27–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Burnet, Frank MacFarlane. 1936. “The Bacteriophages.” Biological Reviews 14(3): 332–350.Google Scholar
  22. Burnet, Frank MacFarlane. 1945. Virus as Organism: Evolutionary and Ecological Aspects of Some Human Virus Diseases. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. 1949. Unités Biologiques douées de continuité génétique. Paris: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique.Google Scholar
  24. Chatton, Édouard. 1937. Titres et travaux scientifiques (1906–1937) de Édouard Chatton. Sottano: Sète.Google Scholar
  25. Chatton, Édouard, Lwoff, Marguerite, and Lwoff, AndrÉ. 1929a. “Les métamorphoses prepalintomiques et metapalintomiques des Fœttingeriidae (Ciliés).” Comptes rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, Paris 188: 273–275.Google Scholar
  26. Chatton, Édouard, Lwoff, Marguerite, Lwoff, André, and Tellier, Louis. 1929b. “L’infraciliature et la continuité génétique des blépharoplastes chez l’actinétien Podophrya fixa (O. F. Muller).” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 100: 1191–1196.Google Scholar
  27. Chatton, Édouard and Lwoff, André. 1930. “Imprégnation, par diffusion argentique, de l’infraciliature des Ciliés marins et d’eau douce, après fixation cytologique et sans dessiccation.” Comptes Rendus de la Société de Biologie 104: 834–836.Google Scholar
  28. Chatton, Édouard, Lwoff, André, and Lwoff, Marguerite. 1929c. “Les infraciliatures et la continuité génétique des systèmes ciliaires récessifs.” Comptes rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, Paris 188: 1190–1192.Google Scholar
  29. Chatton, Édouard, Lwoff, André, and Lwoff, Marguerite. 1931a. “L’infraciliature de l’Infusoire thigmotriche Sphenophrya dosiniae Ch. et Lw. Topographie, structure, et développement.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 107: 532–536.Google Scholar
  30. Chatton, Édouard, Lwoff, André, and Lwoff, Marguerite. 1931b. “Sur la continuité génétique des systèmes ciliaires chez les Ciliés Fœttingerides.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 107: 536–540.Google Scholar
  31. Chatton, Édouard, Lwoff, André, and Lwoff, Marguerite. 1931c. “La dualité figurée, substantielle et génétique des corps basaux des cils chez les Infusoires: granule infraciliaire et corpuscule ciliaire.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 107: 560–564.Google Scholar
  32. Chatton, Édouard, Lwoff, André, Lwoff, Marguerite, and Monod, Jacques L. 1931d. “La formation de l’ébauche buccale postérieure chez les Ciliés en division et ses relations de continuité topographique et génétique avec la bouche antérieure.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 107: 540–544.Google Scholar
  33. Chatton, Édouard, Lwoff, André, Lwoff, Marguerite, and Monod, Jacques L. 1931e. “Sur la topographie, la structure et la continuité génétique des striés ciliaires chez l’infusoire Chilodon uncinatus.” Bulletin de la Société de Zoologique de France 66: 367–374.Google Scholar
  34. Coleman, William. 1970. “Bateson and Chromosomes: Conservative Thought in Science.” Centaurus 15: 228–314.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Costantin, Julien. 1901. L’hérédité acquise, ses conséquences horticoles, agricoles et médicales. Paris: C. Naud Editeur.Google Scholar
  36. Delage, Yves. 1895. La structure du protoplasma et les théories sur l’hérédité, et les grands problèmes de la biologie généra le. Paris: C. Reinwald.Google Scholar
  37. D’Hérelle, Félix. 1917. “Sur un microbe invisible antagoniste des bacilles dysentériques.” Comptes rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, Paris 165: 373–375.Google Scholar
  38. D’Hérelle, Félix. 1918. “Technique de la recherche du microbe filtrant bactériophage.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 81: 1160–1162.Google Scholar
  39. D’Hérelle, Félix. 1919. “Sur le microbe bactériophage.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 82: 1237–1239.Google Scholar
  40. D’Hérelle, Félix. 1921. Le bactériophage. Paris: Masson. (English translation: The Bacteriophage. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1922).Google Scholar
  41. D’Hérelle, Félix. 1924. “Sur l’autonomie du bactériophage.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 90: 25–27.Google Scholar
  42. D’Hérelle, Félix. 1925. “Sur la nature du bactériophage.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 93: 509–511.Google Scholar
  43. D’Hérelle, Félix. 1926. Le bactériophage et son comportement. Paris: Masson.Google Scholar
  44. D’Hérelle, Félix and Sertic, V. 1930. “Formation, par adaptation, de races de Bactériophages thermo-résistantes.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 104(2): 1256–1260.Google Scholar
  45. Errera, Léo. 1899. “Hérédité d’un caractère acquis chez un champignon pluricellulaire.” Bulletin de la classe des sciences de l’Académie Royale de Belgique 1: 81–102.Google Scholar
  46. Gachelin, Gabriel and Opinel, Annick. 2008. “Theories of Genetics and Evolution and the Development of Medical Entomology in France (1900–1939).” Parassitologia 50: 267–278.Google Scholar
  47. Galperin, Charles. 1987. “Le bactériophage, la lysogénie et son déterminisme génétique.” History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 9: 175–224.Google Scholar
  48. Galperin, Charles. 1994. “De la protistologie à la biochimie de la nutrition: Edouard Chatton et André Lwoff.” Claude Debru, Jean Gayon, and Jean-François Picard (eds.), Les sciences biologiques et médicales en France 1920–1950. Paris: CNRS Editions, pp. 41–54.Google Scholar
  49. Gayon, Jean. 1991. “Un objet singulier dans la philosophie biologique bernardienne : l’hérédité.” Jean Michel (ed.), La nécessité de Claude Bernard. Paris: Klincksieck, pp. 169–182.Google Scholar
  50. Gayon, Jean. 1995. “Les premiers pastoriens et l’hérédité.” Bulletin d’Histoire et d’Epistémologie des Sciences de la vie 2: 193–204.Google Scholar
  51. Gayon, Jean. 2013. “Claude Bernard et l’hérédité.” François Duchesneau, Jean-Jacques Kupiec, and Michel Morange (eds.), Claude Bernard, La méthode de la physiologie. Paris: Editions Rue d’Ulm, pp. 115–132.Google Scholar
  52. Gayon, Jean and Burian, Richard M. 2000. “France in the Era of Mendelism (1900–1930).” Comptes rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, Paris, Life Sciences 323: 1097–1106.Google Scholar
  53. Hershey, Alfred D. and Chase, Martha. 1952. “Independent Functions of Viral Protein and Nucleic Acid in Growth of Bacteriophage.” Journal of General Physiology 36: 39–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Jacob, François. 1954. Les bactéries lysogènes et la notion de provirus. Paris:Masson et Cie.Google Scholar
  55. Jacob, François. 1987. La Statue Intérieure. Paris: Odile Jacob. Translated as The Statue Within. P. Franklin (Trans.). New York: Basic Books, 1988.Google Scholar
  56. Jacob, François. 1998. Of Flies, Mice, and Men. Harvard:Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  57. Jacob, François, Lwoff, André, Siminovitch, and Lou, Wollman, élie. 1953. “Définition de quelques termes relatifs à la lysogénie.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 84: 222–224.Google Scholar
  58. Kabéshima, Tamézo. 1920a. “Sur un ferment d’immunité bactéryolisant, du mécanisme d’immunité infectieuse intestinale, de la nature du dit « microbe filtrant bactériophage » de d’Hérelle.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 83: 219–221.Google Scholar
  59. Tamézo, Kabéshima. 1920b. “Sur le ferment d’immunité bactériolysant.” Comptes rendus de la Société de Biologie 83: 471–473.Google Scholar
  60. Le Dantec, Félix. 1891. La Digestion intracellulaire chez les Protozoaires. Doctoral dissertation. Lille: Imprimerie L. Danel.Google Scholar
  61. Le Dantec, Félix. 1895. La Matière Vivante. Paris: Masson.Google Scholar
  62. Le Dantec, Félix. 1896. Théorie nouvelle de la vie. Paris: Alcan.Google Scholar
  63. Le Dantec, Félix. 1904. “L’hérédité des diathèses ou hérédité mendélienne.” Revue Scientifique 17(1): 513–517.Google Scholar
  64. Le Dantec, Félix. 1907. Eléments de Philosophie biologique. Paris: Alcan.Google Scholar
  65. Lederberg, Esther M. and Lederberg, Joshua. 1953. “Genetic Studies of Lysogenicity in Escherichia coli.” Genetics 38: 51–64.Google Scholar
  66. Loison, Laurent. 2008. “La question de l’hérédité de l’acquis dans la conception transformiste de Maurice Caullery.” Michel Morange and Olivier Perru (eds.), Embryologie et évolution (1880–1950), Histoire générale et figures lyonnaises. Paris: Vrin, Lyon: IIEE, pp. 99–127.Google Scholar
  67. Loison, Laurent. 2010. Qu’est-ce que le néolamarckisme ? Les biologistes français et la question de l’évolution des espèces. Paris:Vuibert.Google Scholar
  68. Loison, Laurent. 2011. “French Roots of French Neo-Lamarckisms, 1879–1985.” Journal of the History of Biology 44(4): 713–744.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Loison, Laurent. 2012. “Le concept de cellule chez Claude Bernard et la constitution du transformisme expérimental.” Jean-Gaël Barbara and Pierre Corvol (eds.), Les élèves de Claude Bernard, Les nouvelles disciplines physiologiques en France au tournant du XXe siècle. Paris: Hermann, pp. 135–149.Google Scholar
  70. Loison, Laurent. 2013. “Monod Before Monod: Enzymatic Adaptation, Lwoff, and the Legacy of General Biology.” History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35: 167–192.Google Scholar
  71. Luria, Salvador E. and Delbrück, Max. 1943. “Mutations of Bacteria from Virus Sensitivity to Virus Resistance.” Genetics 28: 491–511.Google Scholar
  72. Lwoff, André. 1926. “Discussion of an Article by Etienne Burnet and an Article by Eugène and Elisabeth Wollman.” Bulletin de l’Institut Pasteur 24: 68–69.Google Scholar
  73. Lwoff, André. 1932. Recherches biochimiques sur la nutrition des Protozoaires. Paris: Masson.Google Scholar
  74. Lwoff, André. 1936. “Remarques sur une propriété commune aux gènes, aux principes lysogènes et aux virus des mosaïques.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 56: 165–170.Google Scholar
  75. Lwoff, André. 1944. L’évolution physiologique, Etude des pertes de fonctions chez les microorganismes. Paris: Hermann.Google Scholar
  76. Lwoff, André. 1946. “Some Problems Connected with Spontaneous Biochemical Mutations in Bacteria.” Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 11: 139–155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Lwoff, André. 1947. “Inactivation du bactériophage par les autolysats bactériens et par un polysaccharide d’origine non bactérienne par A. Gélin. Discussion.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 73: 507.Google Scholar
  78. Lwoff, André. 1949. “Les organites doués de continuité génétique chez les Protistes.” Unités biologiques douées de continuité génétique. Paris: CNRS, pp. 7–23.Google Scholar
  79. Lwoff, André. 1950a. Problems of Morphogenesis in Ciliates: The Kinetosomes in Development, Reproduction and Evolution. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  80. Lwoff, André. 1950b. Notice sur les titres et travaux scientifiques. Typescript. Archives of the Pasteur Institute (Paris). LWF 1–2.Google Scholar
  81. Lwoff, André. 1951. “Conditions de l’efficacité inductrice du rayonnement ultra-violet chez une bactérie lysogène.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 81: 370–388.Google Scholar
  82. Lwoff, André. 1952. “Rôle des cations bivalents dans l’induction du développement du prophage par les agents réducteur’.” Comptes rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, Paris 234: 366–368.Google Scholar
  83. Lwoff, André. 1953a. “L’induction.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 84: 225–244.Google Scholar
  84. Lwoff, André. 1953b. “Lysogeny.” Bacteriological Reviews 17: 269–337.Google Scholar
  85. Lwoff, André. 1957. “The Concept of a Virus: The Third Marjory Stephenson Memorial Lecture.” Journal of General Microbiology 17(2): 239–253.Google Scholar
  86. Lwoff, André. 1965. “Nobel Lecture: Interactions Among Virus, Cell, and Organism.” The Nobel Foundation, Nobel Lectures. Physiology or Medicine 1963–1970. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co., 1999.Google Scholar
  87. Lwoff, André. 1966. “The Prophage and I.” John Cairns, Gunther S. Stent, and James D. Watson (eds.), Phage and the Origins of Molecular Biology. Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, pp. 88–99.Google Scholar
  88. Lwoff, André. 1971. “From Protozoa to Bacteria and Viruses: Fifty Years with Microbes.” Annual Review of Microbiology 25: 1–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Lwoff, André. 1972. Titres et Travaux. Typescript. Paris: Faculté des sciences, Université de Paris. Archives of the Pasteur Institute (Paris). LWF 1–2.Google Scholar
  90. Lwoff, André. 1988. Unpublished autobiography (no title). Typescript, 188 pp. Archives of the Pasteur Institute (Paris). LWF 25.Google Scholar
  91. Lwoff, André. 1990. “L’organisation du cortex chez les ciliés : un exemple d’hérédité de caractère acquis.” Comptes rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, Paris 310: 109–111.Google Scholar
  92. Lwoff, André and Audureau, Alice. 1941. “Sur une mutation de Moraxella lwoffi apte à se développer dans les milieux à l’acide succinique.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 67: 94–111.Google Scholar
  93. Lwoff, André and Gutmann, Antoinette. 1949a. “Les problèmes de la production du bactériophage par les souches lysogènes. La lyse spontanée du Bacillus megatherium.” Comptes Rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, Paris 229: 605–607.Google Scholar
  94. Lwoff, André and Gutmann, Antoinette. 1949b. “Production discontinue de bactériophages par une souche lysogène de Bacillus megatherium.” Comptes rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, Paris 229: 679–682.Google Scholar
  95. Lwoff, André and Gutmann, Antoinette. 1949c. “La perpétuation endomicrobienne du bactériophage chez un Bacillus megatherium lysogène.” Comptes rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, Paris 229: 789–791.Google Scholar
  96. Lwoff, André and Gutmann, Antoinette. 1950. “Recherches sur un Bacillus megatherium lysogène.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 78: 711–739.Google Scholar
  97. Lwoff, André, Siminovitch, Lou, and Kjeldgaard, Niels. 1950a. “Induction de la production de bactériophages chez une bactérie lysogène.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 79: 815–859.Google Scholar
  98. Lwoff, André, Siminovitch, Lou, and Kjeldgaard, Niels. 1950b. “Sur les conditions de production du bactériophage chez une bactérie lysogène.” Comptes rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, Paris 230: 1219–1221.Google Scholar
  99. Mayr, Ernst. 1982. The Growth of Biological Thought. Diversity, Evolution, and Inheritance. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  100. Monod, Jacques and Wollman, Élie. 1947. “L’inhibition de la croissance et de l’adaptation enzymatique chez les bactéries infectées par le bactériophage.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 74: 937–956.Google Scholar
  101. Morgan, Thomas H. 1910. “Chromosomes and Heredity.” The American Naturalist 44: 449–496.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  102. Northrop, John H. 1939. “Increase in Bacteriophage and Gelatinase Concentration in Cultures of Bacillus megatherium.” Journal of General Physiology 23(1): 59–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. Olby, Robert. 1986. “Structural and dynamical explanations in the world of neglected dimensions.” T. J. Horder, J. A. Witkowski, and C. C. Wylie (eds.), A History of Embryology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 275–308.Google Scholar
  104. Stanley, Wendell M. 1952. “Viruses as chemical agents.” Poliomyelitis. Second International Poliomyelitis Conference. Philadelphia: Lippincott, pp. 6–8.Google Scholar
  105. Summers, William C. 1999. Félix d’Hérelle and the Origins of Molecular Biology. New Haven:Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  106. Summers, William C. 2014. “Félix d’Hérelle, Uncompromising autodidact.” Oren Harman and Michael R. Dietrich (eds.), Outsider Scientists, Routes to Innovation in Biology. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, pp. 60–74.Google Scholar
  107. Twort, Frederick W. 1915. “An Investigation on the Nature of Ultramicrosopic Viruses.” Lancet 2: 1241–1243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  108. Van Helvoort, Ton. 1992. “Bacteriological and Physiological Research Styles in the Early Controversy of the Nature of the Bacteriophage Phenomenon.” Medical History 36: 243–270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  109. Van Helvoort, Ton. 1994a. “History of Virus Research in the Twentieth Century: The Problem of Conceptual Continuity.” History of Science 32: 185–235.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  110. Van Helvoort, Ton. 1994b. “The Construction of Bacteriophage as Bacterial Virus: Linking Endogenous and Exogenous Thought Styles.” Journal of the History of Biology 27(1): 91–139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  111. Varley, A. W. 1986. Living Molecules or Autocatalytic Enzymes: The Controversy over the Nature of Bacteriophage, 1915–1925. PhD Dissertation, University of Kansas, 602 pp.Google Scholar
  112. Waterson, A. P. and Wilkinson, Lise. 1978. An Introduction to the History of Virology. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  113. Wollman, Élie. 1953. “Sur le déterminisme génétique de la lysogénie.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 84: 281–293.Google Scholar
  114. Wollman, Eugène. 1920. “A propos de la note de MM. Bordet et Ciuca (Phénomène de D’Hérelle, autolyse microbienne transmissible de J. Bordet et M. Ciuca, et hypothèse de la pangenèse de Darwin).” Comptes Rendus de la Société de Biologie 83: 1478–1479.Google Scholar
  115. Wollman, Eugène. 1925. “Recherches sur la bactériophagie (phénomène de Twort-d’Hérelle).” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 39: 789–812.Google Scholar
  116. Wollman, Eugène. 1927. “Recherches sur la bactériophagie (phénomène de Twort-d’Hérelle), Deuxième mémoire.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 41: 883–918.Google Scholar
  117. Wollman, Eugène. 1928. “Bactériophagie et processus similaires. Hérédité ou infection?’ Bulletin de l’Institut Pasteur 26: 1–14.Google Scholar
  118. Wollman, Eugène. 1939–1942 [Approximately]. Le bactériophage et le problème des virus. Unpublished typescript. Archives of the Pasteur Institute (Paris). WLL 4.Google Scholar
  119. Wollman, Eugène and Wollman, Elisabeth. 1925. “Sur la transmission « parahéréditaire » de caractères chez les bactéries.” Comptes Rendus de la Société de Biologie 93: 1568–1569.Google Scholar
  120. Wollman, Eugène and Wollman, Elisabeth. 1932. “Recherches sur le phénomène de Twort-d’Hérelle (Bactériophagie). Troisième mémoire.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 49: 41–74.Google Scholar
  121. Wollman, Eugène and Wollman, Elisabeth. 1936. “Recherches sur le phénomène de Twort-d’Hérelle (Bactériophagie). Quatrième mémoire.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 56: 137–164.Google Scholar
  122. Wollman, Eugène and Wollman, Elisabeth. 1938. “Recherches sur le phénomène de Twort-d’Hérelle (Bactériophagie ou autolyse hérédo-contagieuse). Cinquième mémoire.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 60: 13–55.Google Scholar
  123. Zallen, Doris T. 1989. “The Rockefeller Foundation and French Research.” Cahiers pour l’histoire du CNRS 5: 35–58.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laurent Loison
    • 1
  • Jean Gayon
    • 2
  • Richard M. Burian
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre Cavaillès, USR 3608, ENS ParisParisFrance
  2. 2.IHPST, UMR 8590Université Paris-1ParisFrance
  3. 3.Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

Personalised recommendations