Higher Education

, Volume 65, Issue 4, pp 471–485 | Cite as

University of Nottingham Ningbo China and Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University: globalization of higher education in China

Article

Abstract

This essay studies the University of Nottingham Ningbo China and Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University—the two Chinese campuses established respectively by the University of Nottingham and the University of Liverpool. They represent successful models of globalization of higher education in China; however their rationale, strategies, curricula, partnership, and orientation are very different. Through a comparative analysis, the paper reveals their unique development and offers a template for studies of globalization of higher education in China and elsewhere through branch campuses.

Keywords

Transnational education Overseas campuses Globalization Higher education China 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Claremont Graduate UniversityClaremontUSA

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