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Consent for Organ Retrieval Cannot be Presumed

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Correspondence to Mike Collins.

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Collins, M. Consent for Organ Retrieval Cannot be Presumed. HEC Forum 21, 71–106 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10730-009-9088-7

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Keywords

  • Organ Donation
  • Brain Death
  • Naturalistic Fallacy
  • Presume Consent
  • Explicit Consent