Group Decision and Negotiation

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 293–314 | Cite as

Negotiation in Strategy Making Teams: Group Support Systems and the Process of Cognitive Change

Article

Abstract

This paper reports on the use of a Group Support System (GSS) to explore at a micro level some of the processes manifested when a group is negotiating strategy—processes of social and psychological negotiation. It is based on data from a series of interventions with senior management teams of three operating companies comprising a multi-national organization, and with a joint meeting subsequently involving all of the previous participants. The meetings were concerned with negotiating a new strategy for the global organization. The research involved the analysis of detailed time series data logs that exist as a result of using a GSS that is a reflection of cognitive theory.

Keywords

Negotiation Group support systems Strategy making 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Strathclyde Business SchoolGlasgowScotland, UK

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