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Heat stress screening of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) seedlings for acquired thermotolerance

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Abstract

Heat can be one of the major abiotic stresses that adversely affect crop production worldwide at different stages of development. As field screening for heat tolerance can be inconsistent and seasonally-limited, it is important to develop a reliable protocol under controlled conditions that allows simultaneous screening of multiple genotypes. The objective of this research was to develop a straightforward laboratory protocol using acquired thermotolerance (ATT) in peanut seedlings as a measure of one mechanism of heat stress tolerance. Sixteen genotypes, including selected accessions of the US peanut minicore collection along with standard checks, were evaluated for acquired themotolerance in two independent experiments. A change in the temperature sensitivity of chlorophyll accumulation was used as an indicator of acquired thermotolerance. Pre-incubation at 38°C for 4 h before the 30-min 50°C challenge triggered the acquired thermotolerance system of the leaf disks, resulting in chlorophyll accumulation upon exposure to light. There was considerable variation among genotypes for ATT in both experiments. Genotypic ranking for mean ATT values were highly correlated (0.949) in both experiments. The effect of seed weight on ATT was not significant. This method is relatively simple and inexpensive and can be used to screen a large number of genotypes.

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Halee Hughes and Andy Shakespeare for excellent technical assistance throughout this study. Funding for these studies was provided by the Ogallala Aquifer Initiative, the Peanut Collaborative Research Support Project, and the Southwest Consortium for Plant Genetics and Water Resources.

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Correspondence to Mark D. Burow.

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Selvaraj, M.G., Burow, G., Burke, J.J. et al. Heat stress screening of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) seedlings for acquired thermotolerance. Plant Growth Regul 65, 83–91 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10725-011-9577-y

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10725-011-9577-y

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