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Genetic manipulation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) with Arabidopsisˈs heat shock factor HsfA1d improves ROS scavenging system to confront thermal stress

Abstract

Key message

Arabidopsisˈs HsfA1d was found to confer resistance to pea plant against heat stress by enhancing the activity of antioxidant enzymes and decreasing hydrogen per oxide compared to wild type plants.

Abstract

Pea is one of the important cool season food crops. Heat is the most critical abiotic stress that adversely affects pea growth and economic yield. Response to heat stress in plants is mostly regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). The current study aimed at improving heat tolerance of pea plant by incorporating heat shock factor, HsfA1d, isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. Gateway cloning strategy was used for cloning of HsfA1d in plant expression vector pGWB415. The target gene was introduced into pea plant using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation approach. Transformant pea plants revealed five fold increase in the expression of HsfA1d under heat stress (42 °C) compared to room temperature (25 °C). Transgenic and wild type plants exhibited significant difference in their H2O2 content, under thermal stress. Upon exposure to heat stress, wild type plants shown significant increase in their H2O2 content while no such elevation was found in transgenic plants. Similarly, significant difference in superoxide dismutase activities of transgenic and wild type plants was recorded, under thermal stress. Heat stress induced more pronounced increase in SOD activities of transgenic plants compared to wild type. Highly significant increase in proline content and ascorbate peroxidase activities of transgenic plants was observed upon exposure to thermal stress.

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Acknowledgements

The present work was financially supported by Higher Education Commission Islamabad Pakistan. The research facilities were extended by University of Science and Technology Bannu Pakistan.

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ZS conducted the main experiment and collected data. AI helped in conducting research. FUK helped in data analysis. HUK checked the manuscript time to time for improvement. FD contributed in manuscript writing. MZA helped in graph setting.

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Correspondence to Zamarud Shah.

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Shah, Z., Iqbal, A., Khan, F.U. et al. Genetic manipulation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) with Arabidopsisˈs heat shock factor HsfA1d improves ROS scavenging system to confront thermal stress. Genet Resour Crop Evol 67, 2119–2127 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10722-020-00966-9

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Keywords

  • Pea
  • Thermotolerance
  • Heat shock factors
  • HsfA1d
  • Cloning