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Variations in morphological and agronomic traits among Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) accessions

Abstract

Jerusalem artichoke is a diversely-utilized crop. Selection for high yield, inulin content and other economically important traits are useful for improving this crop. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate genetic variability for qualitative and quantitative traits among Jerusalem artichoke accessions and to identify different groups of accessions using morphological and agronomic traits. Seventy-nine accessions were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with two replications in the late rainy season 2008, the early rainy season 2009 and the late rainy season 2009 at Khon Kaen University agronomy farm, Thailand. Morphological and agronomic characteristics were evaluated for genetic variations. High variations were found among Jerusalem artichoke accessions for qualitative and quantitative characters, and selection for these characters is possible. High variations were observed for tuber width, number of tubers/plant, biomass, fresh tuber yield and tuber size. Correlation coefficient between fresh tuber yield and tuber size was positive and significant (0.58, P ≤ 0.01). Improvement of tuber size is a means to improve yield and tuber quality. Based on morphological and agronomic characteristics, Jerusalem artichoke accessions were clustered into four distinct groups (R2 = 0.88). These groups may be used as parental material to generate progenies for further improvement of this crop. This information will enable breeders to make informed decisions about possible heterotic groups for their breeding programs and germplasm conservation.

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Acknowledgments

The study was funded under the Strategic Scholarship Program for Frontier Research Network for the Join Ph.D. Program Thai Doctoral Degree from the Office of the Higher Education Commission, Thailand. Grateful acknowledgments are made to the Thailand Research Fund, the commission of Higher Education and Khon Kaen University for providing financial support through the Distinguish Research Professor Grant of Professor Dr. Aran Patanothai. Grateful acknowledgments are made to the Khon Kaen University Senior Research Scholar Project of Assoc. Prof. Dr. Sanun Jogloy under Khon Kaen University Fund and Plant Breeding Research Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Khon Kaen University. Dr. Corley Holbrook is acknowledged for his suggestions and English editing. The North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station, USA, the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Germany and the Plant Gene Resources of Canada are acknowledged for their donation of Jerusalem artichoke germplasm.

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Correspondence to Sanun Jogloy.

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Puttha, R., Jogloy, S., Suriharn, B. et al. Variations in morphological and agronomic traits among Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) accessions. Genet Resour Crop Evol 60, 731–746 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10722-012-9870-2

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Keywords

  • Genetic variation
  • Heterotic group
  • Helianthus tuberosus
  • Qualitative trait
  • Quantitative trait