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Origin of Near Eastern plant domestication: homage to Claude Levi-Strauss and “La Pensée Sauvage”

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Acknowledgments

This study as supported by a Bikura-ISF grant (no. 1406/05) to SA and AG.

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Correspondence to Shahal Abbo.

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Paper presented at the international and interdisciplinary workshop “Coreal Diversity, Plant Domestication and Human History in the Fertile Crescent” held at the University of Çukurova, Adana, Turkey of the 10–15 May 2009.

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Abbo, S., Lev-Yadun, S. & Gopher, A. Origin of Near Eastern plant domestication: homage to Claude Levi-Strauss and “La Pensée Sauvage”. Genet Resour Crop Evol 58, 175–179 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10722-010-9630-0

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