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“Tum-thang” (Crotalaria tetragona Roxb. ex Andr.): a little known wild edible species in the north-eastern hill region of India

Abstract

Crotalaria tetragona Roxb. ex Andr., locally known as “Tum-thang” was collected from Mizoram state of north-eastern hill region of India during 2008. Its flowers were being sold by the tribal communities in local markets. The buds and flowers are cooked as vegetables and used in garnishing of local food preparations especially in non-vegetarian recipes. This species is reported here as little known Edible type in Indian region and may be considered as a multi-purpose species with potential. Edible uses of some of the Crotalaria species in different regions of world have also been included in the present communication.

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Acknowledgments

Authors are thankful to the Director, National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources (NBPGR) for guidance as well as providing opportunity to survey Mizoram state for germplasm collection of wild economic species. Dr SK Malik and Shri Rakesh Singh are acknowledged for helping in various ways. Thanks are also extended to the personnel from State Medicinal Plants Board, Forest Departments of Mizoram, Mizoram University. Dr ER Nayar and Ms Rita Gupta are also acknowledged for providing facilities for herbarium studies.

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Correspondence to K. C. Bhatt.

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Bhatt, K.C., Pandey, A., Dhariwal, O.P. et al. “Tum-thang” (Crotalaria tetragona Roxb. ex Andr.): a little known wild edible species in the north-eastern hill region of India. Genet Resour Crop Evol 56, 729–733 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10722-009-9428-0

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Keywords

  • Crotalaria tetragona
  • India
  • Little known species
  • North-eastern hill region
  • Underutilized and neglected crops