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GeoJournal

, Volume 83, Issue 2, pp 365–380 | Cite as

Towards household food security in Ghana: assessment of Ghana’s expanded forest plantation programme in Asante Akim South District

  • Jacob Obodai
  • Prince Osei-Wusu Adjei
  • Simon Victory Quarcson Hamenoo
  • Abena Korang Acheampong Abaitey
Article
  • 73 Downloads

Abstract

This study primarily presents a contribution analysis of the outcomes of the expanded forest plantation programme (EFPP) as a community-based forest governance intervention to enhance household food security. A cross sectional research design with simple random sampling technique was used to select the study sites and respondents. In all, four (4) out of ten (10) settlements implementing the EFPP in the Asante Akyim South District of Ghana were selected. Questionnaires were administered to 80 beneficiaries proportionally selected from the study sites and in-depth interviews were conducted with key stakeholders implementing the programme. The discussion of the results was informed by the theory of change analysis framework to assess the contribution of the programme to household food security. The theory of change tool helped to identify progress towards the achievement of potential and probable outcomes of the programme. The findings reveal that the availability of food crops at the household level and the district at large increased through the EFPP. Between the years 2011 and 2013, 2763.1426 Metric Tonnes (Mt) of food crops were produced from 444.4046 ha of land in the district from the programme. Also, an average of GH¢ 229 ($72) comprising both monthly allowances received for planting and nurturing trees and income derived from the sale of food crops produced increased the economic power and livelihood outcomes of beneficiaries. This has had a contributing effect on the physical availability and accessibility of food crops at the household level. Hence, scaling up the EFPP to cover many beneficiaries, and a budget allocation for the food crop production component of the programme through the provision of improved crop seeds for interplanting would promote food production and security at the household and district levels.

Keywords

Forest governance Crop production Food security Community participation Ghana 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacob Obodai
    • 1
  • Prince Osei-Wusu Adjei
    • 2
  • Simon Victory Quarcson Hamenoo
    • 2
  • Abena Korang Acheampong Abaitey
    • 1
  1. 1.Christian Service University CollegeKumasiGhana
  2. 2.Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and TechnologyKumasiGhana

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