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GeoJournal

, Volume 77, Issue 6, pp 791–803 | Cite as

Culture, religion and economy in the American southwest: Zuni Pueblo and Laguna Pueblo

  • Andrea GrugelEmail author
Article

Abstract

Despite glittering casinos, supermarkets, pick-up trucks, trailer homes, satellite dishes, and all the other influences of the dominant Euro-American mainstream society which can be seen everywhere in the American Indian Pueblos of the Southwest, everyday life continues to be strongly characterized by specific Pueblo values, standards of behavior and ideals which are not necessarily in line with those of their Euro-American environment—and sometimes stand in sharp contrast to them. The juxtaposition of poverty and success raises many questions about the relationship between culture, place and economy, and the prospects for sustainable futures in American Indian communities of the Southwest. This paper considers the ways in which social and cultural values in Zuni and Laguna Pueblos influence economic behavior of individuals and community institutions and the implications for governance and development in the region.

Keywords

Zuni Pueblo Laguna Pueblo Economic and social conditions Traditional cultural values Economic development 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universität BonnBonnGermany

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