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Introduction: immigrants and transnational experiences in world cities

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Abstract

Today, in the early 21st century, goods, information, services, financial capital and human beings are flowing across national borders at an ever-accelerating rate. In this context, transnationalism has become a key paradigm in the study of international migration and urbanism. This theme issue on “Immigrants and transnational experiences in world cities” explores these new trends in contemporary international migration, with respect to transnational communities and geographies, in articles grouped according to four themes: international migration and world cities; highly-skilled and low-skilled immigrants; economic impacts; and immigrant experiences in world cities.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the reviewer for comments on the Introduction, as well as all external reviewers. We would also like to take this opportunity to thank Max Marlow, Daniel Sui, Evelien Bakker and Isabel van der Heiden of GeoJournal for their commitment to this theme issue and, of course, all of the contributors without whose work none of this would be possible. Wei Li is grateful to the Canada-US Fulbright Foundation in Canada and the Center of International Exchange of Scholars in the US for granting her a Fulbright Visiting Research Chair position during 2006–2007, as well as for support from the Ethnicity and Democratic Governance Project, the Department of Political Studies, and the Department of Geography at Queen’s University, Canada. Their support and the Fulbright experience have broadened her horizons in international migration studies, and facilitated her co-editing of this issue and co-authoring of the introduction. All remaining errors, however, are entirely ours.

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Li, W., Teixeira, C. Introduction: immigrants and transnational experiences in world cities. GeoJournal 68, 93–102 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10708-007-9070-3

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