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The Forgotten Names of Chemical Elements

Abstract

Chemical elements are the bricks with which Chemistry is build. Their names had a history, but part of it is forgotten or barely known. In this article the forgotten, no more used, never used, and alternatively used names and symbols of the elements are reviewed, bringing to us some surprises and deeper knowledge about the richness of Chemistry. It should be stressed that chemical elements are important not only for chemists but for all people dealing with science. As in any other aspect of our lives, we tend to better understand something by knowing his history. By knowing them we can have a deeply understanding of how science evolves and how it is influenced by our human aspects.

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Correspondence to João P. Leal.

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Leal, J.P. The Forgotten Names of Chemical Elements. Found Sci 19, 175–183 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10699-013-9326-y

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10699-013-9326-y

Keywords

  • Nomenclature
  • History
  • Chemical elements
  • Ancient names
  • Chemistry