Fish Physiology and Biochemistry

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 673–687 | Cite as

The effects of dietary thiamin on oxidative damage and antioxidant defence of juvenile fish

  • Xue-Yin Li
  • Hui-Hua Huang
  • Kai Hu
  • Yang Liu
  • Wei-Dan Jiang
  • Jun Jiang
  • Shu-Hong Li
  • Lin Feng
  • Xiao-Qiu Zhou
Article

Abstract

The present study explored the effects of thiamin on antioxidant capacity of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). In a 60-day feeding trial, a total of 1,050 juvenile Jian carp (8.20 ± 0.02 g) were fed graded levels of thiamin at 0.25, 0.48, 0.79, 1.06, 1.37, 1.63 and 2.65 mg thiamin kg−1 diets. The results showed that malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents in serum, hepatopancreas, intestine and muscle were significantly decreased with increasing dietary thiamin levels (P < 0.05). Conversely, the anti-superoxide anion capacity and anti-hydroxyl radical capacity in serum, hepatopancreas, intestine and muscle were the lowest in fish fed the thiamin-unsupplemented diet. Meanwhile, the activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase, and the contents of glutathione in serum, hepatopancreas, intestine and muscle were enhanced with increasing dietary thiamin levels (P < 0.05). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in serum, hepatopancreas and intestine followed a similar trend as CAT (P < 0.05). However, SOD activity in muscle was not affected by dietary thiamin level (P > 0.05). The results indicated that thiamin could improve antioxidant defence and inhibit lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of juvenile Jian carp.

Keywords

Cyprinus carpio var. Jian Thiamin Oxidative damage Antioxidant Antioxidant enzyme 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was financially supported by the National Department Public Benefit Research Foundation (Agriculture) of China (201003020) and Science and Technology Support Program of Sichuan Province (2011NZ0071). The authors would like to thank the personnel of these teams for their kind assistance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xue-Yin Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hui-Hua Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kai Hu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yang Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wei-Dan Jiang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jun Jiang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shu-Hong Li
    • 1
  • Lin Feng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiao-Qiu Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Animal Nutrition InstituteSichuan Agricultural UniversityChengduChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of EducationSichuan Agricultural UniversityChengduChina

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