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Familial Cancer

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 597–600 | Cite as

Prevalence of HOXB13 mutation in a population of Ashkenazi Jewish men treated for prostate cancer

  • Shaheen Alanee
  • Sohela Shah
  • Joseph Vijai
  • Kasmintan Schrader
  • Robert Hamilton
  • Rohini Rau-Murthy
  • Kara Sarrel
  • Christopher Manschreck
  • James Eastham
  • Kenneth Offit
Original Article

Abstract

We performed a retrospective analysis of germline DNA samples from Ashkenazi Jewish men and a comparison group of non-Ashkenazi men treated for prostate cancer at our institution to determine the prevalence of HOXB13 G84E mutation in prostate cancer patients of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, an ethnic group common to the New York City area. Patients were genotyped for G84E using a TaqMan assay (Applied Biosystems). Positive cases were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Median age at prostate cancer diagnosis was 68 years for 889 Ashkenazi Jewish patients, 64 years for 920 non-Ashkenazi Jewish patients. The median follow up was 9 years for Ashkenazi Jewish patients and 8.8 years for non-Ashkenazi Jewish patients. Only 4 patients were found to be heterozygous carriers of G84E. They were all of non-Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry and were diagnosed at 70, 66, 78, and 49 years of age. Two of them presented with high-risk prostate cancer. The prevalence of G84E in the non-Ashkenazi sample was 0.4 %. HOXB13 G84E mutation was not observed in prostate cancer patients of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry treated at our institution. Screening for G84E, therefore, may be unnecessary in Ashkenazi Jewish men if these results are validated by other studies.

Keywords

Prostatic neoplasms Germline mutation Risk 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Authors received support from the Sabin Family Research Fund and the Sharon Corzine Research Initiative and Sidney Kimmel Center for Prostate and Urologic Cancers and in part by funds provided by David H. Koch through the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shaheen Alanee
    • 1
  • Sohela Shah
    • 1
  • Joseph Vijai
    • 1
  • Kasmintan Schrader
    • 1
  • Robert Hamilton
    • 1
  • Rohini Rau-Murthy
    • 1
  • Kara Sarrel
    • 1
  • Christopher Manschreck
    • 1
  • James Eastham
    • 1
  • Kenneth Offit
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Urology Service, and Department of Medicine, Clinical Genetics ServiceMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA

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