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Euphytica

, 214:53 | Cite as

A new gene Bph33(t) conferring resistance to brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) in rice line RP2068-18-3-5

  • Sabhavat Bhaskar Naik
  • Dhanasekar Divya
  • Nihar Sahu
  • Raman Meenakshi Sundaram
  • Preetinder Singh Sarao
  • Kuldeep Singh
  • Vattikuti Jhansi Lakshmi
  • Jagadish Sanmallappa Bentur
Article
  • 249 Downloads

Abstract

The rice brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) is one of the major pests of rice across Asia. Host-plant resistance is the most ecologically acceptable means to manage this pest. A rice breeding line RP2068-18-3-5 (RP2068) derived from the land race Velluthacheera is reported to be resistant to BPH populations across India. We identified a new R gene [Bph33(t)] in this line using advanced generation RILs derived from TN1 × RP2068 cross through phenotyping at two locations and linkage analysis with 99 polymorphic SSR markers. QTL analysis through IciMapping identified at least two major QTL on chromosome 1 influencing seedling damage score in seed box screening, honey dew excretion by adults and nymphal survival. Since no BPH R gene has been reported on chromosome 1, we designate this locus as a new gene Bph33(t) which accounted for over 20% of phenotypic variance. Scanning the region for candidate gene suggested two likely candidates a leucine rich repeat (LRR) gene and a heat shock protein (HSP) coding gene. Expression profiling of the two genes in the two contrasting parents and RILs showed induction of the HSP gene (LOC_Os01g42190.1) at 6 h after infestation while LRR gene did not show such induction. It is likely that the HSP represented Bph33(t).

Keywords

Brown planthopper (BPH) Resistance gene Bph33(tSSR marker Heat shock protein 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Authors thank the Director of ICAR-Indian Institute of Rice Research, Hyderabad for facilities and encouragement. This research was partly supported by research grants from Department of Biotechnology and Indian Council of Agricultural Research to RMS and JSB (Grant Nos. F.No: BT//AB/FG-II(PH-II)/2009, F.NO: BT//AB/FG-II(PH-II)/2009).

Supplementary material

10681_2018_2131_MOESM1_ESM.xlsx (13 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (XLSX 13 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sabhavat Bhaskar Naik
    • 1
  • Dhanasekar Divya
    • 2
  • Nihar Sahu
    • 2
  • Raman Meenakshi Sundaram
    • 1
  • Preetinder Singh Sarao
    • 3
  • Kuldeep Singh
    • 3
  • Vattikuti Jhansi Lakshmi
    • 1
  • Jagadish Sanmallappa Bentur
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.ICAR-Indian Institute of Rice ResearchHyderabadIndia
  2. 2.Agri Biotech FoundationHyderabadIndia
  3. 3.Punjab Agricultural UniversityLudhianaIndia

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