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An induced brachytic mutant of chickpea and its possible use in ideotype breeding

Abstract

Mutations were induced in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) cultivar ‘JG 315’ through treatment of seeds with ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS). One of the mutants, named JGM 1, had brachytic growth (compact growth), characterized by erect growth habit, thick and sturdy stem, short internodal and interleaflet distances and few tertiary and later order branches. It was isolated from M2 derived from seeds treated with 0.6% EMS for 6 h. Segregation analyses in F2 progenies of its crosses with normal chickpea genotypes (JG 315, ICC 4929, and ICC 10301) suggested that a single recessive gene controlled brachytic growth in JGM 1. This gene was not allelic to the br gene for brachytic growth in spontaneous brachytic mutant E100YM. Thus, the gene for brachytic growth in JGM 1 was designated br2 and the br gene of E100YM was redesignated br1. Efforts are being made to use JGM 1 in development of a plant type with short internodes and erect growth habit. Such plant type may resist excessive vegetative growth in high input (irrigation and fertility) conditions and accommodate more plants per unit area.

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Acknowledgments

We are thankful to the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences, Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India for financial assistance.

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Correspondence to P. M. Gaur.

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Gaur, P.M., Gour, V.K. & Srinivasan, S. An induced brachytic mutant of chickpea and its possible use in ideotype breeding. Euphytica 159, 35–41 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10681-007-9454-y

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Keywords

  • Cicer arietinum
  • Brachytic
  • Compact growth
  • Ideotype breeding
  • Inheritance
  • Induced mutation
  • Short internodes