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New early-maturing germplasm lines for utilization in chickpea improvement

Abstract

Early-maturity helps chickpea to avoid terminal heat and drought and increases its adaptation especially in the sub-tropics. Breeding for early-maturing, high-yielding and broad-based cultivars requires diverse sources of early-maturity. Twenty-eight early-maturing chickpea germplasm lines representing wide geographical diversity were identified using core collection approach and evaluated with four control cultivars in five environments for 7 qualitative and 16 quantitative traits at ICRISAT Center, Patancheru, India. Significant genotypic variance was observed for days to flowering and maturity in all the environments indicating scope for selection. Genotypes × environment interactions were significant for days to flowering and maturity and eight other agronomic traits. ICC 16641, ICC 16644, ICC 11040, ICC 11180, and ICC 12424 were very early-maturing, similar to or earlier than control cultivars Harigantars and ICCV 2. The early-maturing accessions produced on average 22.8% more seed yield than the mean of four control cultivars in the test environments. ICC 14648, ICC 16641 and ICC 16644 had higher 100-seed weight than control cultivars, Annigeri and ICCV 2. Cluster analysis delineated three clusters, which differed significantly for all the traits. First cluster comprised three controls, ICCV 96029, Harigantars, ICCV 2 and two germplasm lines, ICC 16644 and ICC 16641, second cluster comprised 13 germplasm lines and control cultivar Annigeri, and third cluster comprised 13 germplasm lines. Maturity was main basis of delineation of the first cluster from others. Plot yield and its associated traits were the main basis for delineation of the second cluster from the others. Identification of these diverse early-maturing lines would be useful in breeding broad-based, early-maturing and high-yielding cultivars.

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Correspondence to H. D. Upadhyaya.

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Upadhyaya, H.D., Salimath, P.M., Gowda, C.L.L. et al. New early-maturing germplasm lines for utilization in chickpea improvement. Euphytica 157, 195–208 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10681-007-9411-9

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Keywords

  • Chickpea
  • Diversity
  • Early-maturity
  • Genetic resources
  • Quantitative trait
  • Utilization