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Euphytica

, Volume 156, Issue 1–2, pp 117–128 | Cite as

Inheritance of resistance to spotted stem borer, Chilo partellus, in sorghum, Sorghum bicolor

  • H. C. Sharma
  • M. K. Dhillon
  • G. Pampapathy
  • B. V. S. Reddy
Article

Abstract

The spotted stem borer, Chilo partellus, is one of the most important pests of sorghum, and host plant resistance is an important component for the management of this pest. Most of the sorghum hybrids currently under cultivation are based on cytoplasmic male-sterility (CMS). In order to develop a strategy for resistance to stem borer, we studied the traits associated with resistance, and their nature of gene action in F1 hybrids derived from resistant, moderately resistant, and susceptible CMS and restorer lines. The hybrids based on stem borer-resistant, moderately resistant, or susceptible CMS and restorer lines were equally resistant or susceptible as the parents for leaf feeding [Damage rating (DR) 5.8 to 6.6 vs. 5.9 to 6.6], and had significant and decreasing trend in deadheart formation (resistant CMS × resistant restorer lines < moderately resistant CMS × moderately resistant restorer lines < susceptible CMS × susceptible restorer lines), respectively. Proportional contributions of restorer lines were greater than those of the CMS lines for leaf feeding, deadhearts, recovery and overall resistance, stalk length, nodes per plant, stem borer holes per plant, and peduncle tunneling. The general (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) estimates suggested that leaf feeding score, number of nodes, overall resistance score, panicle initiation, recovery score, and stalk length (dominance type of gene action) have been found to be associated with resistance to spotted stem borer, governed by additive type of gene action, their correlation and direct effects in the same direction, and explained 65.3% of the variation in deadhearts, and thus could be used as marker traits to select and breed for resistance to C. partellus in sorghum. The parents having significant SCA effects for two or more resistance traits for either or more parents have also been discussed for their use in the stem borer resistance breeding.

Keywords

Stem borer Chilo partellus Sorghum bicolor Cytoplasmic male-sterility Mechanisms of resistance Gene action 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank entomology staff: V. Venkateshwara Rao, J. Raja Rao, Madhusudhan Reddy, K. Hareendranath, and S.V.N. Chandra for their help in data collection, and Drs. B.U. Singh and P.M. Gaur for their valuable comments.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. C. Sharma
    • 1
  • M. K. Dhillon
    • 1
  • G. Pampapathy
    • 1
  • B. V. S. Reddy
    • 1
  1. 1.International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)Patancheru, HyderabadIndia

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