Ethical Theory and Moral Practice

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 145–164 | Cite as

Adventures in Moral Consistency: How to Develop an Abortion Ethic through an Animal Rights Framework

Article

Keywords

Abortion Animal rights Moral consistency 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Marquette UniversityMilwaukeeUSA

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