Privacy Rights and Protection: Foreign Values in Modern Thai Context

Abstract

The concept of privacy as a basic human right which has to be protected by law is a recently adopted concept in Thailand, as the protection of human rights was only legally recognized by the National Human Rights Act in 1999. Moreover, along with other drafted legislation on computer crime, the law on privacy protection has not yet been enacted. The political reform and the influences of globalization have speeded up the process of westernization of the urban, educated middle-class professionals. However, the strength of traditional Thai culture means that a mass awareness of the concept of privacy rights remains scarce. This paper explicates the Thai cultural perspective on privacy and discusses the influence of Buddhism on privacy rights, including the impacts of globalization and the influence of Western values on the country’s political and legal developments. The paper also discusses the legal provisions regarding privacy protection, and the debates on the smart ID cards policy and SIM cards registration for national security.

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Correspondence to Krisana Kitiyadisai.

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Kitiyadisai, K. Privacy Rights and Protection: Foreign Values in Modern Thai Context. Ethics Inf Technol 7, 17–26 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10676-005-0455-z

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Keywords

  • Buddhism
  • data protection
  • human rights
  • privacy protection
  • privacy rights
  • smart ID cards
  • Thai culture