New Horizons in CSP and Employee/Employer Relationship: Challenges and Risks of Corporate Weblogs

Abstract

The present paper aims at reflecting on the role of weblogs in the relationship between employers and employees, particularly as a tool used within Corporate Social Responsibility activities. The theoretical framework makes reference on one hand to Corporate Social Performance (whose focus is the pragmatic activities of CSR), with particular reference to the stakeholder perspective and to Carroll’s model and, on the other hand, on the development of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) within organizational settings, with an emphasis on employees and corporate weblogs for internal uses. In particular, the present paper aims at presenting challenges, opportunities and risks, in terms of CSR, involving in blogging. A final section is devoted to understanding doocing and recommendations for setting blog policies.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    In addition, Carroll and Buchholtz (2006) stress an issue pretty close to our concern: how to manage ICT in an ethical way.

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Correspondence to Michela Cortini.

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Cortini, M. New Horizons in CSP and Employee/Employer Relationship: Challenges and Risks of Corporate Weblogs. Employ Respons Rights J 21, 291 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10672-009-9129-z

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Key words

  • CSR and CSP
  • stakeholder perspective
  • corporate and employees weblog
  • doocing