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Gender, Organizational Justice Perceptions, and Union Organizing

Abstract

The authors examine the relationship between gender and organizational justice perceptions and the implications of this relationship for organizing women. They employ a survey study design to confirm expectations associated with the anecdotal literature on this topic, namely that women place greater value on interactional justice than on distributive or procedural justice. Results indicate that gender leads to valuing interactional justice more highly only in interaction with race. Specifically, in contrast to white women and both white and black men, black women give greater weight to being treated with dignity and respect than to the other two organizational justice dimensions.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The membership and labor force participation figures derive from Current Population Survey data and are based on the sole or principal job of full and part-time workers in both the private and public sector.

  2. 2.

    Not all of the respondents answered the income and education questions.

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Correspondence to Patricia A. Simpson.

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Simpson, P.A., Kaminski, M. Gender, Organizational Justice Perceptions, and Union Organizing. Employ Respons Rights J 19, 57–72 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10672-006-9032-9

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Key words

  • women
  • unions
  • organizing
  • organizational justice