Governance and sustainable development at higher education institutions

Abstract

Governance issues, here interpreted as the provisions of adequate policy frameworks characterized by reliability and accountability, coupled with resources to support their implementation, are known to be the basis for the implementation of sustainable development measures. This paper discusses the influence of governance in the ways sustainability is perceived and practiced in a higher education context. Apart from due considerations to the role of governance as the basis for regulation and institutional actions and management decisions, this paper reports on an empirical study undertaken in a sample of higher education institutions. This study entailed an analysis of sustainable development policies, certification, organizational structure, budget, reports, team for sustainability, staff training, and challenges for the integration of sustainability and governance. The results suggest that even though there are different opinions and attitudes on the role of governance, it is regarded as an important component in supporting efforts by higher education institutions to include considerations on sustainable development as part of their strategies.

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Correspondence to Amanda Lange Salvia.

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Leal Filho, W., Salvia, A.L., Frankenberger, F. et al. Governance and sustainable development at higher education institutions. Environ Dev Sustain (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10668-020-00859-y

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Keywords

  • Sustainability
  • Higher education
  • Governance
  • Planning
  • Strategies