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Exploration of spatial patterns of congenital anomalies in Los Angeles County using the vital statistics birth master file

  • Radhika Rible
  • Efren Aguilar
  • Angela Chen
  • Joshua L. Bader
  • Leslie Goodyear-Moya
  • Karen Teekadai Singh
  • Suzanne E. Paulson
  • Julie Friedman
  • Nilufar Izadpanah
  • Janet Pregler
Article

Abstract

Research has shown linkages between environmental exposures and population health metrics such as low birth weight and incidence of congenital anomalies. While the exact causal relationship between specific environmental teratogens and suspected corresponding congenital anomalies has largely not been established, spatial analysis of anomaly incidence can identify potential locations of increased risk. This study uses the Vital Statistics Birth Master File to map and analyze the rates of congenital anomalies of births from non-smoking mothers 15–35 years old within Los Angeles County. Hot spot analysis shows that the distribution of congenital anomalies is not randomly distributed throughout the county and identified the Antelope Valley and San Gabriel Foothills as two areas with elevated incidence rates. These results are not explained by potential confounders such as maternal age, race, smoking status, or socioeconomic status and seem to correlate well with the concentration of atmospheric ozone. This approach demonstrates the value of using spatial techniques to inform future research efforts and the need to establish and maintain a comprehensive reproductive health surveillance system.

Keywords

Hot spot analysis Congenital anomalies Environmental exposures Health surveillance 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the Executive Advisory Board of the Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Center.

Supplementary material

10661_2018_6539_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1 mb)
Appendix A Cluster Analysis: Births with Congenital Anomalies, 2006–2010 (Non-Smoking Mothers Ages 15 through 34 Years Old) (PDF 1055 kb)
10661_2018_6539_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (1.1 mb)
Appendix B Suspected Toxic Parcels and EPA Superfund Sites (PDF 1116 kb)
10661_2018_6539_MOESM3_ESM.pdf (1.2 mb)
Appendix C Median Household Income, American Community Survey, 2006–2010 (PDF 1201 kb)
10661_2018_6539_MOESM4_ESM.docx (16 kb)
Appendix D Rates of Congenital Anomalies for Mothers Residing in Hot Spot PUMAs (99% Confidence) by Birth Hospital (DOCX 15 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Radhika Rible
    • 1
  • Efren Aguilar
    • 2
  • Angela Chen
    • 1
  • Joshua L. Bader
    • 2
  • Leslie Goodyear-Moya
    • 3
  • Karen Teekadai Singh
    • 4
  • Suzanne E. Paulson
    • 5
  • Julie Friedman
    • 4
  • Nilufar Izadpanah
    • 6
  • Janet Pregler
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLALos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families, and CommunitiesLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Culture and Linguistics Department, HealthNetGlendaleUSA
  4. 4.Iris Cantor-UCLA Women’s Health Education and Research CenterLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic SciencesUCLALos AngelesUSA
  6. 6.Scripps HealthSan DiegoUSA
  7. 7.Department of Internal MedicineDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLALos AngelesUSA

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