Changes in the abundance and composition of zooplankton from the ports of Mumbai, India

Abstract

Zooplankton abundance, biomass, and composition from the ports of Mumbai, India, were studied by selecting 14 stations in and around the area during three different periods between 2001 and 2002 (Nov 01, Apr 02, and Oct 02). The results are compared with the records available since the 1940s. Copepod species such as Canthocalanus sp., Paracalanus arabiensis, Cosmocalanus sp., Euterpina acutifrons, Nannocalanus minor, and Tortanus sp. which were not reported in the earlier studies were observed during the present investigation. Purely herbivorous forms like Nannocalanus minor, Paracalanus sp., and Temora discaudata were in reduced abundance during Apr 02 sampling which was coupled with reduction in the diatom population. Whereas increased abundance of some carnivorous and omnivorous forms during Apr 02 sampling can be related to the changes in the food web dynamics.

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Correspondence to Arga Chandrashekar Anil.

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Gaonkar, C.A., Krishnamurthy, V. & Anil, A.C. Changes in the abundance and composition of zooplankton from the ports of Mumbai, India. Environ Monit Assess 168, 179–194 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-009-1102-7

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Keywords

  • Zooplankton
  • Copepods
  • Community structure
  • Phytoplankton
  • Diatoms
  • Dinoflagellates
  • Anthropogenic activities
  • Mumbai port