European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 143, Issue 4, pp 641–649 | Cite as

Identification and characterization of Fusarium spp. associated with root rots of field pea in North Dakota

  • Kishore Chittem
  • Febina M. Mathew
  • Matthew Gregoire
  • Robin S. Lamppa
  • Yen Wei Chang
  • Samuel G. Markell
  • Carl A. Bradley
  • Tharcisse Barasubiye
  • Rubella S. Goswami
Article

Abstract

Root rots are a major concern in field pea production in North Dakota. However, it is unclear which pathogens are involved in causing these diseases. This report brings together findings from surveys conducted over four years (2004, 2005, 2008, and 2009). The 2004 and 2005 surveys were mainly aimed at establishing the importance of pea root rot in North Dakota and providing an indication of the most prevalent root rot pathogens. The 2008 and 2009 surveys involved thorough evaluation of root rot incidence and severity, and included isolations and characterization of Fusarium species associated with the root rots. Greater mean root rot incidence and severity were observed in 2009 compared to three previous years. Fusarium species were the most frequently isolated fungal species from infected pea roots, of which F. oxysporum (66.7 and 94.7 % of the fields) and F. avenaceum (71.8 and 89.5 % of the fields) were most commonly isolated in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Pathogenicity tests showed that all nine Fusarium species isolated from symptomatic roots were capable of causing root rot of pea, and isolates of F. avenaceum were the most virulent at causing root rot. Significant differences in virulence were observed among F. avenaceum isolates. The prevalence of F. avenaceum on roots of field peas, and the ability of isolates of this species to cause severe root rot, emphasizes the possibility of this pathogen to emerge as a potential risk under the current cropping practices for pulse crops in North Dakota, and potentially in other regions with similar growing conditions.

Keywords

Fusarium Root rot Field pea Fusarium avenaceum Virulence Pathogenicity 

References

  1. Basu, P. K., Brown, N. J., Crête, R., Gourley, C. O., Johnston, H. W., Pepin, H. S., & Seaman, W. L. (1976). Yield loss conversion factors for Fusarium root rot of pea. Canadian Plant Disease Survey, 56, 25–32.Google Scholar
  2. Bilgi, V. N., Bradley, C. A., Khot, S. D., Grafton, K. F., & Rasmussen, J. B. (2008). Response of dry bean genotypes to Fusarium root rot, caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli, under field and controlled conditions. Plant Disease, 92, 1197–1200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Booth, C. (1971). The Genus Fusarium. Commonw. Mycol. Inst., Kew, England.Google Scholar
  4. Calman, A. I., Tewari, P., & Mugala, M. (1986). Fusarium avenaceum as one of the causal agents of seedling blight of canola in Alberta. Plant Disease, 70, 694.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Clarkson, J. D. S. (1978). Pathogenicity of Fusarium spp. associated with foot rots of peas and beans. Plant Pathology, 27, 110–117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Feng, J., Hwang, R., Chang, K. F., Hwang, S. F., Strelkov, S. E., Gossen, B. D., Conner, R. L., & Turnbull, G. D. (2010). Genetic variation in Fusarium avenaceum causing root rot on field pea. Plant Pathology, 59, 845–852.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Fernandez, M. R. (2007). Fusarium populations in roots of oilseed and pulse crops grown in eastern Saskatchewan. Canadian Journal of Plant Science, 87, 945–952.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Fernandez, M. R., Huber, D., Basnyat, P., & Zentner, R. P. (2008). Impact of agronomic practices on populations of Fusarium and other fungi in cereal and noncereal crop residues on the Canadian prairies. Soil and Tillage Research, 100, 60–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Geiser, D. M., Jimenz Gasco, M. M., Kang, S., Mkalowska, I., Veeraraghavan, N., Ward, T. J., Zhang, N., Kuldau, G. A., & O’Donnell, K. (2004). FUSARIUM-IDv.1.0, A DNA sequence database for identifying Fusarium. European Journal of Plant Pathology, 110, 473–479.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Gordon, T. R., & Martyn, R. D. (1997). The evolutionary biology of Fusarium oxysporum. Annual Review of Phytopathology, 35, 111–128.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Gregoire, M., & Bradley, C. (2005). Survey of root rot diseases affecting dry pea in North Dakota. (Abstr.). Phytopathology, 95, S36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Grünwald, N. J., Coffman, V. A., & Kraft, J. M. (2003). Sources of partial resistance to Fusarium root rot in the Pisum core collection. Plant Disease, 87, 1197–1200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Hwang, S. F., & Chang, K. F. (1989). Incidence and severity of root rot disease complex of field pea in northeastern Alberta in 1988. Canadian Plant Disease Survey, 69, 139–141.Google Scholar
  14. Infantino, A., Kharrat, M., Riccioni, L., Coyne, C. J., McPhee, K. E., & Grünwald, N. J. (2006). Screening techniques and sources of resistance to root diseases in cool season legumes. Euphytica, 147, 201–221.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Jones, F. R. (1923). Stem and root rot of peas in the United States caused by species of Fusarium. Journal of Agricultural Research, 26, 459–477.Google Scholar
  16. Kraft, J. M., & Pfleger, F. L. (2001). Compendium of Pea Diseases and Pests (2nd ed.). St. Paul: The American Phytopathological Society.Google Scholar
  17. Leslie, J. F., Summerell, B. A., & Bullock, S. (2006). Fusarium laboratory manual. Ames: Blackwell Publishing.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Mathew, F. M., Lamppa, R. S., Chittem, K., Chang, Y. W., Botschner, M., Kinzer, K., Goswami, R. S., & Markell, S. G. (2012). Characterization and pathogenicity of Rhizoctonia solani isolates affecting Pisum sativum in North Dakota. Plant Disease, 96, 666–672.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Persson, L., Bødker, L., & Larsson-Wikström, M. (1997). Prevalence and pathogenicity of foot and root rot pathogens of pea in southern Scandinavia. Plant Disease, 81, 171–174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Punja, Z. K., Wan, A., Goswami, R. S., Verma, N., Rahman, M., Barasubiye, T., Seifert, K. A., & Lévesque, C. A. (2007). Diversity of Fusarium species associated with ginseng roots in British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology, 29, 340–353.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Skovgaard, K., Bødker, L., & Rosendahl, S. (2002). Population structure and pathogenicity of members of the Fusarium oxysporum complex isolated from soil and root necrosis of pea (Pisum sativum L.). FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 42, 367–374.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. Xue, A. G. (2003). Biological control of pathogens causing root rot complex in field pea using Clonostachys rosea strain ACM941. Phytopathology, 93, 329–335.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Yli-Mattila, T., Paavanen-Huhtala, S., Bulat, S. A., Alekhina, I. A., & Nirenberg, H. I. (2002). Molecular, morphological and phylogenetic analysis of the Fusarium avenaceum/ F. arthrosporiodes/ F. tricinctum species complex- a polyphasic approach. Mycological Research, 106, 655–669.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Koninklijke Nederlandse Planteziektenkundige Vereniging 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kishore Chittem
    • 1
  • Febina M. Mathew
    • 1
  • Matthew Gregoire
    • 1
  • Robin S. Lamppa
    • 1
  • Yen Wei Chang
    • 1
  • Samuel G. Markell
    • 1
  • Carl A. Bradley
    • 3
  • Tharcisse Barasubiye
    • 2
  • Rubella S. Goswami
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant PathologyNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA
  2. 2.Eastern Cereal and Oil seed Research CenterAgriculture and Agri-Food CanadaOttawaCanada
  3. 3.Department of Crop SciencesUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

Personalised recommendations