European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 136, Issue 3, pp 433–441

A sensitive real-time PCR assay for the detection of the two Melampsora medusae formae speciales on infected poplar leaves

  • Anne-Laure Boutigny
  • Cécile Guinet
  • Agathe Vialle
  • Richard Hamelin
  • Pascal Frey
  • Renaud Ioos
Article

Abstract

Melampsora medusae is a quarantine fungus in the European Union (EU) that causes a damaging leaf rust disease on poplars. Two formae speciales of the pathogen can be distinguished, M. medusae f. sp. deltoidae and M. medusae f. sp. tremuloidae, but the EU plant health directive 2000/29/EC currently in force does not make the distinction between them. EU countries must have the ability to detect and identify rapidly the introduction of these quarantine fungi and to conduct extensive surveys in case of outbreaks. Efficient detection tools are thus needed. In this study, a sensitive real-time PCR assay was developed to detect the presence of M. medusae in poplar leaf samples. A unique primer/hydrolysis probe combination targeting both formae speciales was designed using species-specific polymorphisms observed within the internal transcribed spacer region. An additional primer/hydrolysis probe combination was designed from a region of the 28S rDNA that is highly conserved in the genus Melampsora and used in a separate real-time PCR assay in order to check the quality of the DNA extracted from Melampsora urediniospores. The test developed demonstrated a high sensitivity since it enables the reproducible detection of two M. medusae urediniospore in a mixture of 2 mg of urediniospores (ca 800 000 urediniospores) of other Melampsora species. This new real-time PCR tool should be useful for laboratories in charge of official analyses since it has many advantages over the techniques currently used to monitor this quarantine pathogen in Europe.

Keywords

Melampsora Poplar rust Real-time PCR Quarantine pathogen 

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Copyright information

© KNPV 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne-Laure Boutigny
    • 1
  • Cécile Guinet
    • 1
  • Agathe Vialle
    • 2
  • Richard Hamelin
    • 2
  • Pascal Frey
    • 3
  • Renaud Ioos
    • 1
  1. 1.ANSES, Laboratoire de la Santé des VégétauxUnité de MycologieMalzévilleFrance
  2. 2.Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest ServiceLaurentian Forestry CentreQuébecCanada
  3. 3.INRAUMR1136 INRA Université de Lorraine “Interactions Arbres/Micro-organismes”ChampenouxFrance

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