Pathogenic Botryosphaeriaceae associated with Mangifera indica in the Kimberley Region of Western Australia

Abstract

Members of the Botryosphaeriaceae, in particular Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Neofusicoccum parvum, N. mangiferum and Botryosphaeria dothidea, commonly cause stem cankers, dieback and stem end rot of mangoes worldwide. In the current study, eight taxa of Botryosphaeriaceae were identified as canker-associated fungi, pathogens, potential pathogens or endophytes of mangoes in the Kimberley, Australia. These include Neoscytalidium novaehollandiae, Ne. dimidiatum, Pseudofusicoccum adansoniae, P. ardesiacum, P. kimberleyense, Lasiodiplodia sp. 1, L. iraniensis and L. pseudotheobromae. The pathogenicity of a selection of these species toward fruit and branches was tested. All were pathogenic to mango in comparison to the control, with Lasiodiplodia spp. being the most pathogenic. It appears that either geographic isolation or the unique growing conditions in the Kimberley may have provided an effective barrier to the acquisition or establishment of known botryosphaeriaceous pathogens. Wounds caused by mechanical pruning may provide an entry point for infection, whilst severe pruning may increase plant stress.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Diane White and Leila Eshraghi for their assistance in sequencing some of the isolates. Greg Johnson is thanked for sharing his wealth of knowledge about mango diseases in Australia. Anonymous reviewers are thanked for their invaluable contribution to this manuscript.

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Correspondence to Treena I. Burgess.

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Sakalidis, M.L., Ray, J.D., Lanoiselet, V. et al. Pathogenic Botryosphaeriaceae associated with Mangifera indica in the Kimberley Region of Western Australia. Eur J Plant Pathol 130, 379–391 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10658-011-9760-z

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Keywords

  • Canker pathogens
  • Fungal endophytes
  • Kununurra
  • Mango
  • Tropical horticulture