Educational Studies in Mathematics

, Volume 91, Issue 1, pp 73–86 | Cite as

Criticising with Foucault: towards a guiding framework for socio-political studies in mathematics education

Article

Abstract

Socio-political studies in mathematics education often touch complex fields of interaction between education, mathematics and the political. In this paper I present a Foucault-based framework for socio-political studies in mathematics education which may guide research in that area. In order to show the potential of such a framework, I discuss the potential and limits of Marxian ideology critique, present existing Foucault-based research on socio-political aspects of mathematics education, develop my framework and show its use in an outline of a study on socio-political aspects of calculation in the mathematics classroom.

Keywords

Critique Marx Foucault Critical mathematics education Calculation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Grundschulpädagogik/MathematikUniversität PotsdamPotsdamGermany

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