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Educational Studies in Mathematics

, Volume 80, Issue 1–2, pp 201–215 | Cite as

Dispositions in the field: viewing mathematics teacher education through the lens of Bourdieu’s social field theory

  • Kathleen NolanEmail author
Article

Abstract

Mathematics teacher educators are confronted with numerous challenges and complexities as they work to inspire prospective teachers to embrace inquiry-based pedagogies. The research study described in this paper asks what a teacher educator and faculty advisor can learn from prospective secondary mathematics teachers as they construct (and are constructed by) official pedagogical discourses embedded in mathematics classrooms. Drawing on the theoretical constructs of Bourdieu, I present several pervasive discourses, or dispositions, as storied by prospective mathematics teachers. These discourses highlight prospective teachers’ negotiations of conflicting habitus-field fits during their teacher education field experience. The reflections put forth in this paper offer insights into the roles of mathematics teacher educators and teacher education programs in general.

Keywords

Mathematics teacher education Prospective teachers Field experience Bourdieu Field Habitus Doxa 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of ReginaReginaCanada

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