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Ecotoxicology

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 440–447 | Cite as

Photo-induced toxicity in early life stage fiddler crab (Uca longisignalis) following exposure to Deepwater Horizon oil

  • Leigh M. Damare
  • Kristin N. Bridges
  • Matthew M. Alloy
  • Thomas E. Curran
  • Brianne K. Soulen
  • Heather P. Forth
  • Claire R. Lay
  • Jeffrey M. Morris
  • James A. Stoeckel
  • Aaron P. Roberts
Article

Abstract

The 2010 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil rig led to the release of millions of barrels of oil in the Gulf of Mexico. Oil in aquatic ecosystems exerts toxicity through multiple mechanisms, including photo-induced toxicity following co-exposure with UV radiation. The timing and location of the spill coincided with both fiddler crab reproduction and peak yearly UV intensities, putting early life stage fiddler crabs at risk of injury due to photo-induced toxicity. The present study assessed sensitivity of fiddler crab larvae to photo-induced toxicity during co-exposure to a range of environmentally relevant dilutions of high-energy water accommodated fractions of DWH oil, and either <10, 50, or 100% ambient sunlight, achieved with filters that allowed for variable UV penetration. Solar exposures (duration: 7-h per day) were conducted for two consecutive days, with a dark recovery period (duration: 17-h) in between. Survival was significantly decreased in treatments the presence of >10% UV and relatively low concentrations of oil. Results of the present study indicate fiddler crab larvae are sensitive to photo-induced toxicity in the presence of DWH oil. These results are of concern, as fiddler crabs play an important role as ecosystem engineers, modulating sediment biogeochemical processes via burrowing action. Furthermore, they occupy an important place in the food web in the Gulf of Mexico.

Keywords

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon Fiddler crab Deepwater Horizon Photo-induced toxicity 

Notes

Funding

This study was conducted within the Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) investigation, which was cooperatively conducted by NOAA and other Federal and State Trustees. The scientific results and conclusion of this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the view of NOAA or any other natural resource Trustee for the BP/Deepwater Horizon NRDA.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All applicable international, national, and/or institutional guidelines for the care and use of animals were followed.

Supplementary material

10646_2018_1908_MOESM1_ESM.docx (117 kb)
Supplementary Table 1

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leigh M. Damare
    • 1
  • Kristin N. Bridges
    • 1
  • Matthew M. Alloy
    • 1
  • Thomas E. Curran
    • 1
  • Brianne K. Soulen
    • 1
  • Heather P. Forth
    • 2
  • Claire R. Lay
    • 2
  • Jeffrey M. Morris
    • 2
  • James A. Stoeckel
    • 3
  • Aaron P. Roberts
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological Sciences & Advanced Environmental Research InstituteUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  2. 2.Abt AssociatesBoulderUSA
  3. 3.School of Fisheries Aquaculture and Aquatic SciencesAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA

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