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Social Robots and Young Children’s Early Language and Literacy Learning

Abstract

Due to recent advances in technology, social robots are emerging as educational tools with the potential to enhance early language and literacy skills in young children. Social robots are defined as machines that can socially interact and communicate intelligently with humans. A review of the literature was conducted to explore current knowledge on social robots and early language and literacy learning in typically developing children (0 to 8 years old). The database search terms were “social robots” AND (literacy OR language) AND “education”. Twelve databases were searched and 13 studies met the search criteria. Five key themes were identified: A theoretical framework for learning with social robots; Child engagement with social robots; Social robots and language and literacy activities; Social robots and language and literacy learning; and Characteristics of social robots for education. Few studies were found that specifically addressed social robots and early literacy learning. Although social robots were found to support early language learning, further research is needed to investigate social robots and early literacy learning in young children.

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Neumann, M.M. Social Robots and Young Children’s Early Language and Literacy Learning. Early Childhood Educ J 48, 157–170 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-019-00997-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-019-00997-7

Keywords

  • Social robots
  • Language
  • Literacy
  • Young children
  • Education