Project-Based Inquiry (PBI) Global in Kindergarten Classroom: Inquiring About the World

Abstract

In the current article, two kindergarten teachers and two university researchers explain how 45 kindergarten students collaboratively engaged in a specific inquiry approach called Project-Based Inquiry (PBI) Global. PBI Global consists of five-phases: (a) ask a compelling question, (b) gather and analyse sources, (c) creatively synthesize claims and evidences, (d) critically evaluate and revise, and (e) share, publish, and act. The teachers were in a master’s degree program that led to K-12 reading certification. The PBI Global was an assignment in the course, New Literacies and Media. Specifically, the teacher team addressed the question: How can teachers use inquiry and digital tools to teach global awareness with kindergarten students? Applying the PBI Global process, the teachers used the book, Same Same but Different (Kostecki-Shaw and Adam, 2015) as an anchor text to students’ exploration of the five senses through different cultural artifacts. Additionally, the kindergarten students utilized Flipgrids to explain their findings for an authentic audience of parents and community members. The article concludes with lessons learned about implementing the process and implications for other kindergarten teachers who may be interested in inquiry-based learning.

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Fig. 1

Adapted from Spires, H.A., Kerkhoff, S.N., & Graham, A.C.K. (Spires, Kerkhoff and Graham 2016). Disciplinary literacy and inquiry: Teaching for deeper learning. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 60(2), 151–161

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Correspondence to Hiller A. Spires.

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Johnson, L., McHugh, S., Eagle, J.L. et al. Project-Based Inquiry (PBI) Global in Kindergarten Classroom: Inquiring About the World. Early Childhood Educ J 47, 607–613 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-019-00946-4

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Keywords

  • Inquiry
  • Kindergarten
  • Global awareness
  • Digital tools