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Teaching Magnetism to Preschool Children: The Effectiveness of Picture Story Reading

Abstract

As the introduction of natural sciences in early childhood education differs from natural sciences for adults, planning appropriate activities for preschool is a delicate task with various dimensions and parameters. Teaching natural sciences in kindergarten can be a complex procedure which combines exploring and comprehending children’s perceptions, scientific content and the learning environment. Magnetism, which is very attractive subject for young children, is a commonly negotiated topic at the preschool level. In this paper, we present an empirical case study that examines whether the picture story reading method can be beneficial for young children learning about magnetism. Findings underline the importance of drawing on a variety of evidence in assessing young children’s understanding of magnets.

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Acknowledgements

Particular thanks are due to the children who participated in this research and to their teachers for facilitating and supporting our work with the children.

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Correspondence to Michail Kalogiannakis.

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Kalogiannakis, M., Nirgianaki, GM. & Papadakis, S. Teaching Magnetism to Preschool Children: The Effectiveness of Picture Story Reading. Early Childhood Educ J 46, 535–546 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-017-0884-4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-017-0884-4

Keywords

  • Early childhood education
  • Magnetism
  • Educational intervention
  • Kindergarten
  • Story reading