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Engaging Students in Traditional and Digital Storytelling to Make Connections Between Pedagogy and Children’s Experiences

Abstract

Traditional and digital storytelling is a powerful literacy tool which engage students in making connections between pedagogy and academic content. Definitions of traditional and digital storytelling, pedagogical methods aligned with curriculum standards, and examples of literacy centers associated with storytelling in early childhood classrooms are shared. The theoretical framework, Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK), is included to illustrate how pedagogy, storytelling, and technology interact to teach content knowledge and 21st-century skills. The five literary elements and additional elements of stories identified from research which enhance students’ engagement in stories are provided. A checklist for selecting stories, book lists and storytelling websites offer resources that will support teachers in using both digital and traditional storytelling with their students.

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Correspondence to Peggy S. Lisenbee.

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Lisenbee, P.S., Ford, C.M. Engaging Students in Traditional and Digital Storytelling to Make Connections Between Pedagogy and Children’s Experiences. Early Childhood Educ J 46, 129–139 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-017-0846-x

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Keywords

  • Traditional storytelling
  • Digital storytelling
  • Literacy centers
  • Pedagogy
  • 21st-century skills
  • Student engagement