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Family Fun Nights: Collaborative Parent Education Accessible for Diverse Learning Abilities

Abstract

Quality early childhood education programs have a responsibility to provide enriched educational services to preschool students paired with parent support, education, and outreach. Pearl Buck Preschool, a non-profit organization devoted to the delivery of preschool services for children of parents with intellectual disabilities or learning difficulties, created a unique parent program titled Family Fun Night. This six-session series was developed with a strengths-based, collaborative framework and was connected to the Program-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports implementation in the preschool. The following paper discusses the development, facilitation, implementation, logistics, and assessment of the Family Fun Night series. Barriers to implementation are also discussed.

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Acknowledgments

The paper was completed without outside funding although the program discussed in the manuscript was made possible by The Children’s Trust Fund of Oregon.

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Correspondence to Christen Knowles.

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This paper is not under review elsewhere and the authors do not have a conflict of interest to declare.

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Knowles, C., Harris, A. & Van Norman, R. Family Fun Nights: Collaborative Parent Education Accessible for Diverse Learning Abilities. Early Childhood Educ J 45, 393–401 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-016-0801-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-016-0801-2

Keywords

  • Early childhood
  • Parent education
  • Parent-directed learning
  • Program-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports
  • Parenting with learning challenges